Atomos Shinobi – Well Priced Ninja V Without Recorder

The Atomos Shinobi is a new 5″ HDMI on-camera monitor with a 1000nits 1920×1080 HDR screen, known from the Ninja V. It is lightweight, runs on one Sony NP-F750 type battery and offers lots of features to help monitor the image and even sound levels. It is shipping now for $399 USD (and €399) plus tax.

The new Atomos Shinobi HDMI Monitor. Source: Atomos

In the industry, Atomos is mostly known for their HDMI and SDI on-camera video recorders, which happen to have great, bright HDR screens. The company is now launching their newest addition to their portfolio – a high brightness 1000nits 5″ 1920×1080 HDMI monitor, named Atomos Shinobi. The specs sound familiar? That’s right – it consists of the same HDR monitor as the popular on-camera recorder Atomos Ninja V.

Atomos Shinobi – Ninja V’s More Affordable Cousin

With its 200g (7 oz), the Shinobi is a lightweight device. For reference, the Ninja V weighs 320g (11.3 oz), not including the weight of the battery. The body of the monitor is made out of polycarbonate and should be durable. It has ¼” – 20 mounting points on the top and bottom, to allow flexible mounting. There is a headphone jack on the side, which allows users to monitor audio from most cameras – even if they don’t have a built-in audio headphone jack (So sound travels via HDMI). Clear on-screen audio level meters help monitoring audio, too.

As mentioned above, the Atomos Shinobi shares the same HDR 1920×1080 display and color processing found in the Atomos Ninja V recorder. The 1000nit brightness screen makes it easy to monitor the image clearly, even in daylight.  It has a pixel density of 427 PPI (pixels per inch) and is factory calibrated for color accuracy. The screen can display 10+ stops of dynamic range, when being used with Log or HLG HDR outputs. Atomos’ color science gives a complete range of in-built gamma presets to match popular cameras when shooting Log or HLG.

There is one HDMI-in port and a headphone jack on the left side. Source: Atomos

The Shinobi can run for up to six hours on a single Sony NP-F750 type battery, which lots of filmmakers probably already have in their kit. A clear on-screen battery gauge shows the status of the battery, indicating when it is running low. The battery plate is positioned in the centre for better balance when mounted to mirrorless cameras. There is one HDMI-in port, which can accept signals up to DCI 4K (4096×2160) at 30fps, or HD video up to 60fps.

Shinobi Backside with battery plate. Source: Atomos

Atomos Shinobi uses the AtomOS 10 system with the same touch-screen interface as all the other Atomos products. It allows users to quickly magnify the image or engage peaking to check focus, pull up false color, a histogram, zebras or waveform to gauge exposure, or add guides or markers to aid composition. With one swipe, all of the menus go away for a totally clear view of the image and its framing.

The Atomos Shinobi looks identical on the top and bottom side. Source: Atomos

For Log image monitoring, it is possible to easily load compatible LUTs directly into Shinobi’s built-in memory via SD card. The internal memory can take up to eight LUT files. In addition, countless LUTs can be kept on the SD card and loaded when needed. The same SD card slot can also be used to install any future firmware updates.

Atomos’ new multi-tool called Analysis sounds (and looks) quite interesting to me. It simultaneously shows the image, plus waveform, histogram, vectorscope and audio-level meters. In addition, there are multiple options inside each of these tools. This gives the operator a complete picture of what is going on within the image, at any time.

The Analysis Tool. Sourse: Atomos

A major benefit of Shinobi is that it can be properly color-calibrated, using the free Atomos software and the X-rite i1Display Pro probe. All monitors’ colors drift over time and routine calibration ensures that the colors remain as accurate as they originally left the factory. Also, there is a flip-screen function which mirrors the image – a valuable feature for vloggers.

The Atomos Shinobi is available for purchase now. The price is set at $399 USD (€399 in Europe) plus local taxes. I can see this bright monitor appeal to lots of mirrorless filmmakers, who don’t like external recording, and maybe even to beginning focus pullers, as the brightness is quite impressive.

What do you think about Atomos’ latest offering? Do you use a monitor for your work or is the camera’s viewfinder more than enough? Would you choose the Atomos Shinobi over the Ninja V? Let us know in the comments underneath the article.

The post Atomos Shinobi – Well Priced Ninja V Without Recorder appeared first on cinema5D.

Original source: https://www.cinema5d.com/atomos-shinobi-priced-ninja-recorder/

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Wooden Camera Zip Box Pro – Tiny Mattebox Now Shipping

The Wooden Camera Zip Box Pro starts shipping today. Originally premiered at IBC 2018, the Zip Box Pro provides some common mod cons of a traditional mattebox but in a very compact form.

The original Zip Box was a glorified filter holder, made from rubber and with a metal clamp it simply wrapped around the front of your lens, holding a single filter in place.

The Zip Box Pro is much more of a lightweight mattebox.

Weighing about 12oz, the Zip Box Pro is super small, it can hold up to 3 stacked 4X5.65” filters, and has a ridged base so that 1-2 filters can tilt to eliminate glare.

There are no trays, the filters simply load from the front and secure via snap top clamp; included also is a carbon fibre top flag

There are two versions the Zip Box Pro Swing Away and the Zip Box Pro Clamp On.

Zip Box Pro Swing Away

The Swing Away version relies on a pair of 15mm rods in standard configuration, mounting via tension-based hinge.

The hinge has adjustment through 2 small allen threads; it can move 8mm in vertical direction as well as offering a small degree of tilt to the entire box (also for anti glare).

On the back there is a 114mm opening that can receive a cloth donut around the outside, or reduction rings on the inside to suit your front lens diameter. Available sizes are 110mm, 104mm, 95mm, 87mm, and 80mm.

Zip Box Pro Clamp On

The Clamp On version simply has a different back, there’s tension thumb clamp to attach to the front of your lens.

There are different sized clamp on backs to suit your specific lens – 114mm, 110mm, 104mm, 95mm, 87mm, and 80mm.

Isn’t it just a Bright Tangerine Misfit?

If you know your matteboxes you’ll notice straight away the similarities with the Bright Tangerine Misfit range. As an owner of both the Misfit and Misfit Atom I can chime in on their differences, as it’s clear each product brings something different to the table.

The Misfit Atom is lighter, but needs reducing donuts for clamp on use that don’t stick to one side (mattebox or the lens), this make lens changes longer-than-it-should. It does not have a swing away option.

The Misfit is the version with a swing away arm. The arm will provide more up/down adjustment than the Zip Box Pro, and also has more conventional stages with filter holder, albeit at much more weight.

The Zip Box Pro reducers look better than the Misfit Atom for sure – the Zip Box Pro Clamp On has physical different backs, making it much more efficient in the field, it also has the ability to hold up to 3 filters (v 2 on the Misfit Atom), and the anti-glare tilt action is quicker to access.

Therefore the Zip Box Pro kind of sits in the middle of the two Misfits – it offers a little more as a clamp on box to the Misfit Atom, and ‘gets by’ as a swing away before missing a few features of the heavier Misfit.

I can see the Zip Box Pro being a great option to people looking for a compact, lightweight solution for gimbal, aerial and remote camera use. It will also make a great ‘first mattebox’ for operators looking to delve into the world of professional filtration, but without too much investment and jump-up in workflow.

Prices for various options below.

The post Wooden Camera Zip Box Pro – Tiny Mattebox Now Shipping appeared first on cinema5D.

Original source: https://www.cinema5d.com/wooden-camera-zip-box-pro-tiny-mattebox-shipping/

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Fujifilm X-T30 First Impressions

The Fujifilm X-T30 is a new APS-C mirrorless camera, offering 26 megapixels and using the Fujifilm XF lens mount.

We were shown a pre-production version of the X-T30 by Fujifilm ahead of today’s launch. We’ve shot some sample JPEG and RAW images with the camera and got some hands-on time with the X-T30.

So read on for our first impressions of the new Fujifilm X-T30 APS-C mirrorless camera…

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/OLgUNemgNYs/first_impressions

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Fujifilm XP140 Tough Camera

The Fujifilm XP140 tough camera features a new processor, updated design and improved durability while maintaining a compact and lightweight body with a variety of automatic shooting functions.

The Fuji XP140 comes in four colours, Lime, Yellow, Graphite and and Sky Blue and will be available from March 2019 priced at £179.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/O6J9QhFRuqw/news

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Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR Lens

The Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR is a compact, lightweight and stylish wide-angle lens for X Series mirrorless cameras. This lens features a focal length equivalent to 24mm (in the 35mm format) and has a maximum aperture of F2.8.

The Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR will be available in silver and black and will be available from March and May/June 2019 priced at £349 / $399.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/GU3-DP3B9WA/fujifilm_xf_16mm_f2_8_r_wr_lens

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Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR Hands-on Photos

Want to see exactly what the new Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR lens looks like in the flesh?

Check out our extensive hands-on gallery of photos of the Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR lens.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/Y3KWEpW9_Lw/fujifilm_xf_16mm_f2_8_r_wr_hands_on_photos

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Fujifilm X-T30 Hands-on Photos

Want to see exactly what the new Fujifilm X-T30 APS-C mirrorless camera looks like in the flesh?

Check out our extensive hands-on gallery of photos of the Fujifilm X-T30 mirrorless camera, including side-by-side comparisons with the X-T3 and the X-T20.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/rjJVlHQD0Pw/hands_on

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Fujifilm X-T30 APS-C Mirrorless Camera

The new Fujifilm X-T30 mirrorless camera is designed for all photographers, from beginner to advanced.

The Fujifilm X-T30 comes in three colours, Black, Silver and Charcoal Silver, and will be available from March 2019 for Black and Silver and May 2019 for Charcoal Silver, priced as follows:

  • Fujifilm X-T30 Body Only – £849 / $899
  • Fujifilm X-T30 with XC 15-45mm lens – £899 / $999
  • Fujifilm X-T30 with XF 18-55 lens – £1199 / $1299

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/X311WSrxYus/news

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Nikon Unveil Firmware Plans for Z7 and Nikon Z6 Mirrorless Cameras

Nikon have announced further details on the development of new firmware for its full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Nikon Z7 and Nikon Z6. The firmware will enable new functions, such as Eye-Detection AF, RAW video output, and support for CFexpress memory cards. In addition, the cameras’ AF/AE functions will be improved.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/4LkViem6GzI/nikon_unveil_firmware_plans_for_z7_and_nikon_z6_mirrorless_cameras

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Atomos Shinobi 5-inch HDMI Monitor for $€399

The Atomos Shinobi is a high brightness 1000nit 5-inch HDMI monitor that’s perfect for vloggers, creatives and photographers. Shipping today, the Shinobi costs $399US / €399 / £339 plus local taxes.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/RVafpnF6jgY/atomos_shinobi_5_inch_hdmi_monitor_for_399

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Nikon Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Full-frame Mirrorless Lens

The Nikon Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S is the first f/2.8 pro lens for the Nikon Z full-frame mirrorless camera system. The Nikkor Z 24–70mm f/2.8 S is a professional lens that boasts an exceptionally compact build, advanced optics, and extensive weather sealing.

The Nikon Z 24–70mm f/2.8 S will be available from April 2019 priced at £2199 / €2599 / $2299.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/YIQGZKLwVDc/nikon_z_24_70mm_f_2_8_s_full_frame_mirrorless_lens

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What would Ansel Adams Shoot with Today? Small is Beautiful by Delbert

What would Ansel Adams Shoot with Today? Small is Beautiful by Delbert – See his website HERE Poor Ansel wrecked his back carrying his very heavy 1930s photo equipment to out of the way locations. […]

Original source: http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2019/02/15/what-would-ansel-adams-shoot-with-today-small-is-beautiful-by-delbert/

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Hands-On First Look: Over 60 Canon EOS RP Sample Images

Michelle Rae Uy

Steve’s Digicams recently joined Canon Cameras USA in New Orleans for an early look at the new Canon EOS RP camera. Check out our full first impressions review over HERE and feel free to scroll through and/or download our 60+ sample images below. At this time, we’re unable to process our RAW images, so we’ll make sure to follow up with a full review and RAW images in the not too distant future.

Thanks so much for reading!

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The post Hands-On First Look: Over 60 Canon EOS RP Sample Images appeared first on Steve's Darkroom.

Original source: http://www.steves-digicams.com/blog/hands-on-first-look-over-60-canon-eos-rp-sample-images/

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Canon EOS RP Released – A Few Less Features for Way Less Money

Today Canon has unveiled their latest addition to their new EOS R lineup of full frame mirrorless cameras: The Canon EOS RP sits below the already available EOS R in regards of both, features and pricing. This aggressive pricing might be a good thing, though: As a bottom line we get plenty of features for less money. Update: There are six new RF lenses in development, too.

EOS RP
Canon’s transition from the legacy EOS D line of DSLRs to the EOS R line of full frame mirrorless cameras seems to be in full swing. Next up: The new EOS RP. It’s not the flagship R camera many of us are eagerly waiting for, though. If the EOS R is the middle class body, the RP is the entry level model.

It’s less expensive and it has fewer features but it is based on the same robust platform. So what is the news with the new Canon EOS RP? Well, in terms of cost-performance ratio it might get the nod instead of its bigger brother, the EOR R (read our coverage here and here plus our full review here).

Canon EOS RP

First of all, the EOS RP is smaller than the EOS R, by quite a bit. Fact check? EOS RP: 485 g (with card and battery), EOS R: 660 g. The EOS RP lacks the top OLED status screen, same goes for the so-called touch bar on the back.

EOS RP

Canon EOS RP (left) and EOS R (right).

Both models share a weather-sealed body featuring a magnesium alloy chassis including sealing materials to provide dust and moisture resistance. So the EOS RP isn’t an entry level design in that regard, it’s a tough tool for outdoor work. The EOS R features a 3.0″ (7,5cm) flippy screen with 1.04 million dots we already know from its bigger brother (but slightly smaller in size) and a 0.39″ OLED electronic viewfinder with 2.36 million dots and 0.7x magnification.

EOS RP

Both models share the same DIGIC 8 image processor but the EOS R fuels that processor with a 30.3MP full frame sensor while the RP has a 26.2 MP full frame CMOS sensor to offer. Same processor, same Dual Pixel AF complete with face detection! Also on board is the digital 5-axis image stabilization engine. Another thing the EOS RP inherits from its bigger brother is the lack of dual SD card slots, unfortunately. Only one UHS-II SD card can be loaded.

Movie Recording

The Canon EOS RP shoots 4k UHD, FullHD (1920 x 1080) and HD (1280 x 720). This is true when using RF or EF lenses (with a RF-EF adapter). If you are using EF-S lenses, your options are limited to 4K UHD and HD. No FullHD. Movies are being recorded as MPEG4 AVC/H.264 files with variable (average) bit rate. The following resolutions and frame rates are available (hint: no 4K/60p, no FullHD/120p slow mo):

  • 4K UHD (16:9) 3840 x 2160 (25, 23.98 fps) intra frame
  • 4K UHD Time-lapse (16:9) 3840 x 2160 (29.97, 25 fps) All-I
  • Full HD (16:9) 1920 x 1080 (59.94, 50, 29.97, 25 fps) intra frame, intra frame lite (29.97, 25 fps)
  • Full HD HDR (16:9) 1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25 fps) intra frame
  • HD (16:9) 1280 x 720 (59.94, 29.97, 50, 25 fps) intra frame
  • HD HDR (16:9) 1280 x 720 (29.97, 25 fps) intra frame
EOS R

No touch bar.

These bitrates are available:

  • 4K (16:9) 3840 x 2160 (25, 23.98 fps) IPB 120Mbps // 869 MB/min
  • Full HD (59.94p/50.00p)/IPB Approx. 60 Mbps // 440MB/min
  • Full HD (29.97p/25.00p)/IPB: Approx. 30 Mbps // 225MB/min
  • Full HD (29.97p/25.00p)/IPB Lite: Approx. 12 Mbps // 87MB/min
  • HD (59.94p/50.00p)/IPB Approx. 26 Mbps // 196MB/min

When recording internally to SD card, the color subsampling tops out at YCbCr 4:2:0 8-bit. External recording through the built-in HDMI port is possible via an uncompressed YCbCr 4:2:2, 8-bit stream. Sound output via HDMI is also possible. When outputting to external monitor/recorder internal recording is disabled and Wi-Fi communication is shut down. Bad news: No Log-C and 4K recording only works with contrast detection AF. Furthermore, when shooting 4K you’ll end up with an approx. 1.6x crop factor.

EOS RP

No OLED status display.

Canon’s own Dual Pixel CMOS AF with face detection and tracking AF is available while shooting (DPAF only in FHD and HD), Other modes include movie servo AF, continuous eye AF and manual focus with focus peaking. The ISO value is selectable from 100 ISO all the up to 12800 (in 4K UHD) or 25600 (FullHD/HD). Furthermore, a build-in stereo microphone delivers 2 channels of 48 kHz, 16-bit audio. External microphones can be hooked up via 3.5mm jack and there’s a headphone jack for monitoring audio, too.EOS RPThe three already available mount adapters also fit the EOS RP, of course, so you can use your existing EF and EF-S glass with this camera. Read all about these adapters here.

Six new RF Lenses in Development

The range of readily available RF glass is not yet very extensive. Not any more! Today Canon has officially announced the development of six new RF lenses. They will become available later this year and there is no pricing yet but the specs come in pretty impressive:

  • RF85mm F1.2 L USM
  • RF85mm F1.2 L USM DS
  • RF15-35mm F2.8 L IS USM
  • RF24-70mm F2.8 L IS USM
  • RF70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM
  • RF24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM

The “DS” for the 85mm F1.2 stands for “Defocus Smoothing” which should make out-of-focus areas and bokeh even smoother and more appealing. Maybe this lens is your next dream portrait lens.

EOS RP

Six new RF lenses! (The dimensions aren’t accurate).

The three red ring zooms make the next generation holy trinity of zoom lenses, just as their former EF counterparts. And all three feature image stabilization, which is pretty cool! Lastly, the 24-240mm offers an impressive zoom range which makes this lens a perfect travel companion. It lacks a fast aperture, though. This is a compromise that most travelers will be happy to accept as it opens the door to a compact and relatively lightweight lens.

Conclusion

The EOS RP isn’t a groundbreaking camera but it seems to be pretty solid tool for enthusiasts and aspiring filmmakers alike. Canon’s new R mount opens the door for many new (and fast) lenses and the superb overall build quality of this new camera body is typical for Canon. Let’s wait and see how this EOS RP performs in hands-on and reviews but I think this camera is a solid release. Nothing miracle but really solid plus it comes with a very attractive price tag.

EOS RP
We presume that the video performance of the new camera will be pretty much at par with the EOS R, so you can refer to Johnnie’s CanonEOS R review here. Let’s see if the EOS RP really performs at the same level which would be pretty cool, especially when considering its’ lower price.

Product information: Canon USA

What do you think about the new EOS RP in regards of the already available EOS R camera? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

The post Canon EOS RP Released – A Few Less Features for Way Less Money appeared first on cinema5D.

Original source: https://www.cinema5d.com/canon-eos-rp-released-a-few-less-features-for-way-less-money/

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Panasonic LUMIX S1 – Closer Look and Sample Footage – A New Lowlight King?

The Panasonic LUMIX S1 is the latest in Panasonic’s offerings. It is a full frame camera, aimed at advanced photographers, but can also capture high quality 4K videos. The new camera will greatly benefit from the firmware update scheduled for later this year, so the appeal for videographers will be even higher. I’ve been running around with the yet to be released camera and had a chance to explore its video capabilities a little  further. 

Panasonic LUMIX S1

While getting to know the new Panasonic S1 in Barcelona was nice, I felt that there is much more to explore about it and have therefore decided to dedicate some extra time and review the camera, although it is still in a pre-production stage. First, let’s have a quick recap in regards to its video specifications.

Panasonic S1 Video Specifications:

  • 24.2 MP CMOS Sensor
  • 4K HLG (Hybrid Log Gamma) internal video recording, HEVC codec in 10-bit 72Mbps
  • 4K 50/60p, 4:2:0 8-bit, cropped to APS-C, internal recording limited to 29:59 min
  • 4K 24/25/30p Full Frame, 4:2:0 8-bit, unlimited recording
  • Various Full HD recording modes
  • Various High Frame Rate recording options in 4K and HD (No control on any of the recording parameters like shutter speed and ISO, no autofocus, no sound. 150fps and 180fps in HD mode are cropped)
  • Native ISO of 100-51,200

Future paid firmware update unlocks:

  • 4K UHD up to 30p, 10-bit 4:2:2 internal recording (At 150Mbps)
  • 4K UHD 50/60p, 10-bit 4:2:2 external recording via HDMI with APS-C crop
  • FHD at up to 60fps, 10-bit 4:2:2 at 100Mbps
  •  V-Log

Panasonic S1 top view – Large, robust, comfortable to hold

Panasonic LUMIX S1 – First Impression and Handling

As a reviewer, I get to use many of the new cameras out there and leaving specifications aside, there are always those cameras that simply feel more comfortable in the hand – the Panasonic LUMIX S1 falls into this category. This mirrorless camera is big, heavy and robust (especially when equipped with the new 24-105mm f/4 L lens), so you better think of it as if you are carrying a DSLR, but in this particular case, this is NOT a bad thing, as the camera felt very balanced in my hands and I could work with it for exceptionally long periods of time. This brings me to another advantage of working handheld with this camera: its IBIS (In Body Image Stabilization) system is simply working very well! If you feel the need for even extra smoothness in your shots, you can turn the E-Stabilization (Video) “ON” and – on the expense of a slight crop – you will get perfectly steady shots. (Everything that you see in the above video nut two shots, was shot handheld and although the stabilisation is enhanced digitally, to my eyes, there was no drop in picture quality).

Panasonic S1 E-Stabilization option

Call me an old-fashioned cameraman, but a viewfinder is a much more valuable and suitable for my style of working than an external monitor, as it gives me an extra gripping point when working handheld and also, in bright light, I can judge the exposure more accurately and easily. The reason I’m mentioning this here is because up until now, most – if not all – of the mirrorless cameras I’ve worked with had “just an OK” EVF (with the exception of the Leica SL). The Panasonic S1 brings back the faith in the possibility that an excellent EVF can be included in a mirrorless camera. I can report first-hand that manual focusing is a breeze and eye fatigue is a thing of the past, when extensively using that particular EVF. Well done, Panasonic! Last but not least, a word about battery life. The new DMW-BLJ31  7.2V 3,100mAh large capacity battery did very well during my shooting day(s). Again, Panasonic kept its reputation of equipping their cameras (aka GH5/GH5S) with long lasting batteries.

Panasonic S 24-105mm f:4 L mount lens – ISO 5000

 

Panasonic S 24-105mm f:4 L mount lens – ISO 30,000

 

Panasonic S 24-105mm f:4 L mount lens – ISO 2000

 

Panasonic S 24-105mm f:4 L mount lens – ISO 12,800

Lowlight capability (The above images were taken from the editing timeline)

This is where the camera REALY shines! Previously, I’ve seen similar results only when testing some of Sony’s cameras. As a documentary filmmaker, the lowlight capabilities of a camera can be a deal breaker, when considering what camera to purchase, as I never know where I’m going to find myself filming, or if I will have the time to set up proper lighting on location (whenever possible). With the Panasonic S1, there is absolutely nothing to worry about. Aggressive NR (Noise Reduction) or not, you can shoot and expect clean images up to ISO 30,000. (Not that above that figure the images are not usable, they are but with additional noise). As a picture is worth more than a thousands words, I encourage you to take a look at my above video and see for yourself.

Autofocus system

If there is anything that needs some extra care and attention from Panasonic’s side, it is the autofocus system. The main thing, when using autofocus with any camera, is the ability to get good and constant results. With the Panasonic S1, I got mixed bag results. At times, I was very happy with the speed and accuracy of the autofocus system and then, there were times where the camera simply did not function well. As I was testing a pre-production model with a non-final firmware, I assume that Panasonic will do all they can do, in order to fine-tune the autofocus system within this camera, before it hits the stores.

Dynamic Range Test

We are continuing with our tradition of testing the Dynamic Range of new cameras, and although the sample unit we had is NOT a final one, we were rather curious about what ballpark range we stand in. Please head to this link in order to learn more about our Dynamic Range tests.

Gunther, our DR specialist has tested 3 picture profiles and modes. HLG, Cinelike D and the new Flat picture profile. Here are his observations: 

HLG option in the camera menu

HLG, ISO 400 (12.2 stops)

V-Log will come at a later stage, with a paid firmware upgrade, however with the Panasonic S1 you can already shoot in Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) mode. (HEVC codec, 4:2:0 10bit long GOP 72Mbps). 

Setting both, sharpness and noise reduction (NR) to -5, I was able to get a Dynamic Range of 12.2 stops at ISO400 for a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 2 (13.4 stops at SNR = 1), see figure 1 below.

Fig. 1: Panasonic S1 waveform plot of the step chart in HLG ISO400, noise reduction set to -5 (lowest). Visually, 12 stops above the noise floor are visible – a very good result!

This is a very good result, which is only topped by the Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro – see figure 2 below.

Fig. 2: Dynamic Range comparison of the Panasonic LUMIX S1 – it comes in just behind the URSA Mini Pro 4.6

If we compare this result to the Dynamic Range of the Panasonic GH5S in HLG mode (ISO800, NR = 0) coming in at 9.9 stops, this is about 2.3 stops higher! Now, the same GH5S has a Dynamic Range of 10.7 stops (ISO400) with V-Log L, hence, there is some potential for the Panasonic S1 to have an even better DR reading once V-Log becomes available!

Looking at the noise floor and the lower steps of the step chart of the Panasonic S1, there is very little noise visible – it looks ultra clean. Although noise reduction was set to the lowest setting, we can assume that there is still a lot of internal noise reduction going on. (I also tried shooting the chart with noise reduction set to 0 (NR = 0), but there was very little difference).

Personally, I would prefer to have more influence on the internal noise reduction through the settings – maybe a future firmware update will enable this. For me, if the image is too clean, it lacks mojo.

Cinelike D picture profile (10.8 stops)

Panasonic LUMIX S1 Cinelike D DR result

If you are not interested or ready to shoot in HLG, Cinelike D might be a good option. As you can see from the chart above, we got 10.8 stops of DR in this mode.

Flat picture profile – Unmeasurable

Flat picture profile – Unmeasurable

I was very curious to measure the new Flat picture profile – especially as Johnnie shot all of the above video in that mode – but to my surprise, it was unmeasurable. As you can see in the above figure in the upper chart, there is a very abrupt transition in the brightness value (density) response curve from the higher into the lower stops (representing the Xyla 21 patches). Furthermore, in the middle chart the RMS noise curve falls off to zero between -5 and -4 LOG exposure values (on the x-axis), and in the lower chart again, between -6 and -4 LOG exposure the lower stops (shadows) of the Xyla chart show zero pixel noise (lowest chart of the three) – thus confusing IMATEST. The software, therefore, shows a wrong 12.6 stops for all signal to noise ratios – which cannot be real, of course. I don’t know what it is, but it seems as if a very aggressive noise reduction is responsible for those unmeasurable results. In general, we can only hope that Panasonic will consider giving us more control on the noise (meaning, the ability to turn the reduction off all together) in a future firmware update.

Choose between FullFrame or APSC filming options

Conclusion

The LUMIX S1 camera is Panasonic’s first attempt (alongside the S1R) of entering the world of full frame sensor cameras and as such, I think they did really well! They are presenting a well-balanced shooting device (specification- vs. performance-wise), although I have to say that I wish the video images received would have a bit more “mojo” in them. The Current  image is very clean – maybe too clean, at times. It is only in post-production that you can actually turn it into having a more distinguished identity (keeping in mind that it is an 8bit camera, so color correction needs to be treated gently)… Moving to pricing, in Panasonic’s eyes, this is probably a camera for photographers first and then for us filmmakers, hence, I do understand the reason why they decided to charge extra money for the additional features. I guess, they do not want photographers – who are the main target of that camera – to pay a price if it is not needed. Fair enough. Saying that, it is an expensive camera and the price cannot be neglected, when doing the overall calculation before buying (any) camera. And further than that, we have gotten spoiled, while one of the companies to spoil us most is… Panasonic. They proved in the past that they are able to provide us with cameras that can shoot high data rate, 10bit, 4:2:2, all Intra, internally, so I won’t be surprised if this will be the case this time, too. The basics are all there, all Panasonic needs to do is top up the video specifications and produce a “video centric” camera and charge us a fair price. In case this ever happens, it’s going to be a real treat!

Panasonic LUMIX S1

The above video was shot handheld on a pre-production Panasonic LUMIX S1 camera. Image quality is not final. Picture profile “Flat”. Edited on Adobe Premiere CC latest edition and color corrected with FilmConvert.

What do you think? Does the new Panasonic LUMIX S1 interest you? Will you consider buying it or do you prefer waiting for Panasonic to produce a more capable camera that shoots video? Share with us your thoughts in the comment section below. 

The post Panasonic LUMIX S1 – Closer Look and Sample Footage – A New Lowlight King? appeared first on cinema5D.

Original source: https://www.cinema5d.com/panasonic-lumix-s1-review/

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New FUJIFILM X-T30 Released – The X-T3’s Little Brother is Here

Today FUJIFILM released their new X-T30 mirrorless camera with APS-C sized sensor. While housed in a more compact and more lightweight body than its bigger brother, the X-T30 sport the same sensor, the same processor and the same film simulations from the X-T3. Even F-log is on board!

X-T30

The new FUJIFILM X-T30 comes in three colors. The one in the middle is called “charcoal silver”.

The new X-T30 is pretty tiny and especially lightweight (383g) compared to the bigger X-T3 (539g). Yet both models share the same 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 4 sensor along with the X-Processor 4 image processing engine. The X-T30 can record 4K DCI (4096×2160) or 4K UHD (3840×2160) at up to 30p @ 200Mbps in 4:2:0 8-bit internally. Externally, you can record 4:2:2 10-bit video via HDMI. All the proprietary film simulations such as Velvia, ASTIA, Classic Chrome or Eterna are available during movie recording. Furthermore, you can choose to film in F-log for a wider color gamut.

FUJIFILM X-T30

This new model isn’t part of FUJIFILM’s premier league of mirrorless cameras. Its two-digit name puts it in the second devision, yet the pure specs speak another language: 4K 25p/30p, F-log, 4:2:2 10-bit output, FullHD 100p/120p @ 200Mpbs. Not bad! There’s a downside though as the recording times are pretty limited:

  • C4K (4096×2160) // 29.97p/25p/24p/23.98p // 200Mbps/100Mbps // up to approx. 10min
  • 4K UHD (3840×2160) // 29.97p/25p/24p/23.98p // 200Mbps/100Mbps // up to approx. 10min
  • Full HD (2048 ×1080) // 59.94p/50p/29.97p/25p/24p/23.98p // 200Mbps/100Mbps // up to approx. 15min.
  • Full HD (1920×1080) // 59.94p/50p/29.97p/25p/24p/23.98p // 200Mbps/100Mbps // up to approx. 15min.
  • Full HD (1920×1080) // 120p/100p // 200Mbps // up to approx. 6min.

Video is being recorded in MOV (MPEG-4 AVC/H.264) format. No H.265, unfortunately.. that’s another downside of this camera.

The X-T30 features the same EVF of the former X-t20, a 0.39″ OLED with 2.36 millions dots and 0.62x magnification. The rear touch screen is a 3.0″ LCD with a 3:2 aspect ratio 3:2, approx. 1.04 millions dots and, according to FUJIFILM, with improved response performance.

X-T30

New omnidirectional control lever.

The rear of the X-T30 features the “Focus Lever” from the X-T2 / X-T3, resulting in more grip space. The X-T20 had a 5-way control button but the new focus lever omnidirectional control is way better suited for quick focus point adjustments. Overall, the X-T30 has the same body as the former X-T20 but with an improved grip design hat makes the camera body sit comfortably in your hand.

X-T30

The “old” X-T20 rear design with 5-way selector button.

Unfortunately, FUJIFILM communicates color subsampling and bit rates for 4K (DCI and UHD) shots, but there is no word about these values for FullHD. I’ll update this article once they surface.

The autofocus capabilities have been improved from the former X-T20, since the X-Processor 4 is just much more powerful for calculating the necessary algorithms in less time. The AF detects faces and eyes and you can select a face if multiple faces have been detected within a frame. The low-light limit for phase detection AF has been extended from +0.5EV (X-T20) to -3EV.

The micro USB 2 port of the X-T20 has been upgraded to a modern USB Type-C (USB3.1, Gen1) port on the X-T30. The micro HDMI (type D) is still the same, ditto the 2.5mm stereo mini connector for an external microphone. No headphone out..

Availability and Conclusion

The X-T30 will be available from the end of March but the new color scheme called “charcoal silver” will take just a little bit longer to hit the shelves.

X-T3

This new X-T30 is far more a mini X-T3 than the former X-T20 was a mini X-T2. F-log, Eterna film simulation, 4K 4:2:2 10-bit output through HDMI, fast continuous AF, it’s all there. The X-T3 is the more capable camera, sure but this X-T30 is way smaller, lighter and more affordable without too many compromises to make.  So if you’re in the market for a solid entry-level filmmaking device: This might be worth a very close look!

Links: FUJIFILM Website

What do you think? Will you wait for the X-T30 or is the X-T3 the better camera for you? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

The post New FUJIFILM X-T30 Released – The X-T3’s Little Brother is Here appeared first on cinema5D.

Original source: https://www.cinema5d.com/new-fujifilm-x-t30-released-the-x-t3s-little-brother-is-here/

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Fujifilm Improve Camera Remote App for iOS and Android

Fujifilm have launched a new version of their Camera Remote app which improves overall usability and connectivity. Version 4.0 will offer a newly designed interface with an easier pairing process, an “Album” function that allows you to browse only the images imported from the camera, and a more stable connection between the camera and smart device.

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/b-j97pO0XuQ/fujifilm_improve_camera_remote_app_for_ios_and_android

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Fujifilm X-T30 First Impressions

The Fujifilm X-T30 is a new APS-C mirrorless camera, offering 26 megapixels and using the Fujifilm XF lens mount.

We were shown a pre-production version of the X-T30 by Fujifilm ahead of today’s launch. We’ve shot some sample JPEG and RAW images with the camera and got some hands-on time with the X-T30.

So read on for our first impressions of the new Fujifilm X-T30 APS-C mirrorless camera…

Original source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/photographyblog/~3/OLgUNemgNYs/first_impressions

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