Sigma has done more for enthusiast APS-C than Nikon, Canon and Sony combined

There’s no reason APS-C can’t be a good enthusiast format, with the right lenses.

Full-frame is being touted as the future of enthusiast as well as professional photography. But I’d argue that APS-C is still a highly capable format and one that makes sense for a lot of people. That could be true for an even broader group if it was properly supported as an enthusiast format. And, I’d contest, one company has consistently done more to support the big brand’s users than the camera makers themselves.

The past few years have seen a wave of full-frame launches and, from the original EOS 5D through to the Sony a7 series and EOS RP, the falling prices of full-frame cameras have made them accessible to an ever-wider number of people. This focus on relatively profitable models (and lenses) is only likely to continue as the camera market contracts back to catering for a core of dedicated photographers, rather than trying to sell to everyone. But what does this mean for APS-C?

While all the buzz is around full-frame, the industry still sells more APS-C cameras and there are many, many times more of the smaller-chipped cameras in circulation than there are full-framers. Should these countless millions of cameras be seen as a temporary aberration, now being corrected, or can APS-C still be a good fit for enthusiasts?

The aberrant puny stepchild camera

Sony’s new a6400 camera has an APS-C sensor and some of the best autofocus performance around. It’s also got a decent lens on it in this photo, but it’s a lens that costs just as much as the camera itself.

There’s an argument that APS-C is simply a quirk of history: that camera makers only embraced it because it was the largest format they could manufacture affordably enough to actually sell, and that they were always going to revert to ‘full-frame’ as soon as it became cost-effective. But, while much of this is true, it that doesn’t mean that APS-C is too small or can only be a stop-gap. After all, there’s nothing intrinsically optimal about full-frame*.

After all, there’s nothing intrinsically optimal about full frame

You could equally make the opposite argument: that full-frame is an arbitrary reference point for comparisons that remained in the imagination because of the popularity of the film format it’s based on, not any inherent ‘rightness’ of it. But, I’d argue, it’s also because the SLR makers didn’t want to give up on all the money they’d invested in designing extensive lineups of lenses for film, so never really committed to APS-C as a serious format.

Serious support?

Way back, photographers could get a Nikon 17-55mm F2.8 ‘pro’ lens for APS-C cameras like the D80. Today, users can get the same lens or newer and more ambitious offerings from Sigma. (And the 35mm F1.8 DX seen here is one of only four DX primes Nikon has ever released.)

To make the most of any format, you need bright lenses. And that will mean different things to different photographers. I’m going to argue that what you really need is a choice of bright primes and F2.8 (or faster) zooms if you’re going to make a format useful to a range of enthusiasts.

Look across the ranges of Nikon and Canon and you’ll see a smattering of APS-C-specific lenses: a pro-grade 17-55 F2.8, a wide-angle zoom with a moderate maximum aperture and perhaps a macro or two. That’s often the extent of the support for enthusiasts. Sure there’ll be countless kit-zooms, maybe a mid-market 18-one-hundred-and-something and an 18-200mm for the all-in-one crowd. But look for a decent prime and chances are your options are limited to full-frame lenses.

To make the most of APS-C you really need
a choice of bright primes and
F2.8 (or faster) zooms

Want an 85-90mm equiv portrait lens? Shush! Buy a 50mm and learn not to frame so tight, or accept that you’ll have to use something longer, buy an 85mm and SPEAK UP A BIT so your subject can hear you. Looking for a 24mm equiv prime (hardly the most exotic request)? Well, sorry about that.

And it’s this lack of lens support, rather than any shortcoming of the format that I’d argue has always undermined it. Which is odd, as Nikon has, with the D300/D500 and D7000 series cameras, made some very nice enthusiast models. Likewise Canon with its EOS X0D models. But the net effect is the implication that full-frame is the ideal end-point and that APS-C isn’t suitable for enthusiasts: it’s purely a stepping-stone.

S for sufficient?

What’s that? An 85mm F1.8 equivalent prime? Fujifilm’s lens lineup lets you get ‘full-frame image quality’ when you need it, without having to lug full frame lenses round the rest of the time.

But APS-C can be a highly capable format. Like Micro Four Thirds, it can be small and affordable when you want it to be, but you can extend its capability considerably if you add a bright lens where you need it. Image sensors have improved to an amazing extent over the lifespan of APS-C, with technology improving to push both low light performance and dynamic range to new limits. And, while full-frame chips have gotten better by a similar amount, there’s no reason to think that people’s needs and expectations have become more demanding at the same rate.

APS-C can be a highly capable format: it can be small and affordable when you want it to be, but you can extend its capability if you add a bright lens where you need it

If APS-C has exceeded ‘good enough’ for a lot of applications, then what does it matter that full-frame has gotten even better? (I’ll concede that reviews can contribute to this: we can show which camera is better, but can’t tell you whether you, personally, need that improvement). Finally, it’s worth noting that in the era of mirrorless, there’s no direct connection between sensor size and viewfinder size/brightness, so there are fewer downsides than ever to APS-C.

Sigma to the rescue

Lenses like the Sigma 56mm F1.4 give you great low light performance and subject separation on crop-sensor cameras like Sony’s a6500.
ISO 1000 | 1/100 sec | F1.4

But in the end, you just need lens support. And I’d argue that Sigma has done more to support APS-C as an enthusiast format than the big camera makers have. Fujifilm should get some recognition: having picked APS-C as its enthusiast format, it’s built the most comprehensive lineup there’s ever been (and perhaps Canon’s 32mm F1.4 for EF-M is the beginning of something interesting for that system) but Sigma deserves credit not just for its commitment but also for its innovation.

Fujifilm has built the most comprehensive APS-C lineup there’s ever been

As a third-party lens maker, Sigma offered some affordable alternatives to the camera makers’ own, such as its 17-50mm F2.8, but it also branched-out to offer lenses that neither of the big two made. Its 50-150mm F2.8 remains one of my favorite lenses of the period: it offered the coverage of a 70-200mm had on film, but was smaller, lighter and cheaper, giving it a real advantage over an actual 70-200. (Pentax also deserves credit for its 50-135mm F2.8, part of the most complete own-brand APS-C lens lineups for DSLR).

But in recent years, Sigma’s commitment to APS-C has been redoubled: creating lenses that extend what you can expect the format to do. The 18-35mm F1.8 is a lens that lets APS-C cameras match the depth-of-field and low-light performance of a full-frame camera with a 27-52mm F2.8 zoom, obviating the need to upgrade, perhaps. On top of this, it’s made a 50-100mm F1.8, letting APS-C match a full-framer with a 75-150mm F2.8. Again, this lets an enthusiast who likes to dabble in sports gain ‘full-frame image quality’ for their sports shooting, without having to bear the weight and cost of full-frame when they’re shooting other subjects.

And onward

Sigma’s 16mm F1.4 is a fantastic lens for Sony E-Mount (and, of course, Micro Four Thirds)

Sigma’s continued this trend into the mirrorless space. Sony started its E-mount system with a 16mm F2.8 prime: exactly the sort of lens I was saying was always missing from the DSLR lineups (even if that particular lens is a case of ‘be careful what you wish for’). It’s produced a couple of interesting primes since then but now seems to have totally shifted its attention to full-frame. This again risking the door being closed on APS-C as an enthusiast format. But, again, Sigma has stepped in.

Not only has Sigma made a F1.4 16mm for Sony’s APS-C E-mount, it’s also created a 30mm and a 56mm F1.4. It hasn’t made any fast zooms for mirrorless, but this trio of primes again allows APS-C shooters to squeeze the most out IQ of their cameras, if they don’t need full-frame performance all the time. Something worth considering if you’re thinking about switching systems.

Another thing to consider might be that the standout lenses for the fledgling full-frame mirrorless cameras are often the 24-105mm and 24-70mm F4s: lenses that could be matched in capability by a 16-70mm F2.8 on APS-C. If anyone feels like making one. Hint, hint.


*Anyone saying it allows an ideal compromise between image quality and lens/camera size clearly hasn’t been keeping track of the increasing bulk of the lenses for the latest mirrorless full-frame cameras.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/opinion/2075375377/sigma-has-done-more-for-enthusiast-aps-c-than-nikon-canon-and-sony-combined

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Swiss lens manufacturer Irix is expanding into the Japanese market

Swiss optics manufacturer Irix has announced it’s expanding its presence into the Japanese market.

Founded in Switzerland in 2016 by an international team of professional photographers, Irix quickly expanded into all areas of the European market and beyond, creating unique and affordable lenses, filters and accessories for photographers around the globe.

The announcement appropriately comes ahead of CP+ 2018, which is taking place in Japan. Irix will be at booth G-62 every day over the course of CP+ (February 28th through March 3rd) and says ‘each guest will be able to test every Irix product and personally speak with Irix team members.’

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/9711322307/swiss-lens-manufacturer-irix-is-expanding-into-the-japanese-market

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Video: first impressions of the Canon EOS RP

Got a couple of minutes? Then you have all the time you need to learn about Canon’s second full-frame mirrorless camera body. Technical Editor Richard Butler has been able to do some shooting with the camera and gives a full rundown of its feature set – and explains why it’s a compelling option for someone stepping into full-frame for the first time.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/videos/4391574911/video-first-impressions-of-the-canon-eos-rp

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Live Q&A with DPReview editors about the Canon EOS RP

Want to know more about the Canon EOS RP? Dying to ask a question that hasn’t been addressed anywhere else online? Join the editors of DPReview for a live Q&A about this new camera next Tuesday, Feb. 19 on our YouTube channel.

If you have a question but can’t watch live, leave it below in the comments and we’ll do our best to answer it during the event. We’ll post a direct link to the live stream shortly before it goes live. Here’s a list of what time to tune in depending on your location:

Location Time Day
Seattle 09:00 Tuesday
New York 12:00 Tuesday
UTC 17:00 Tuesday
Europe (CET) 18:00 Tuesday
Tokyo 02:00 Wednesday
Melbourne 04:00 Wednesday

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/articles/1229873877/live-q-a-with-dpreview-editors-about-the-canon-eos-rp

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The Atomos Shinobi is a light, bright 5″ 1920×1080 HDMI monitor for $399

Atomos has released the Shinobi, a new super bright 5in 1920×1080 HDMI monitor designed with vloggers and photographers in mind.

The Atomos Shinobi weighs just 200g / 7oz thanks to its polycarbonate body and uses the same HDR display and color processing technology found in Atomos’ popular Ninja V monitor/recorder. It features a 1000nit screen for easy viewing in bright situations, has a pixel density of 427PPI, and includes a headphone on the side of the device to add external recording, even if the camera being used doesn’t have one built-in.

Atomos says the Shinobi comes color calibrated straight from the factory, but also includes calibration support using Atomos’ free software and the X-rite i1Display Pro probe. It features a six-hour battery life on a single Sony NP-F750 battery, which is cleverly placed in the middle of the device to help keep it balanced on top of cameras.

The device features Atomos’ AtomOS 10 touchscreen interface and all of the features that come with, including focus peaking, histogram, zebras, waveforms, guides, markers and magnification. There’s even a mirrored option for vloggers who will have the monitor facing backwards on their device.

Despite having just a 1920×1080 display with 60fps support, the Shinobi’s HDMI port can actually accept signals up to 4K (4096×2160) at 30fps. The screen displays 10+ stops of dynamic range when being used with Log or HLG HDR video and built-in gamma presets are included to match popular camera systems when shooting Log or HLG.

Up to eight LUTs can also be installed directly onto the Shinobi using its built-in memory, with the ability to add even more using the SD card slot. Once installed, the LUTs can be switched on-the-fly to compare one look to another.

The Atomos Shinobi is available now from B&H and authorized Atomos retailers for $399 USD.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/1276579254/atomos-announces-the-shinobi-a-light-and-bright-5-1920×1080-hdmi-monitor

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Kosmo Foto launches Mono 120 black-and-white film, now available for pre-order

Kosmo Foto has launched pre-orders for its Mono film in 120 format, adding the new product alongside the 35mm version launched in 2017. According to the company, the first batch of Mono 120 has entered production and will be sold exclusively through the Kosmo Foto shop. Future batches of the film will be available through Kosmo’s retailers and distributors, as well.

In its announcement today, the company explained:

Mono has proven to be really popular with film photographers – it’s now stocked in photography shops all over the world, and been bought by photographers from Greenland to Greece and Costa Rica to the Czech Republic.

Not everyone, however, shoots 35mm film. The resurgence that film has enjoyed over the last few years has also seen many people shooting on medium format cameras from humble Holgas through to Hasselblads.

So Kosmo Foto is very pleased to be able to say that Kosmo Foto Mono 120 is now available to pre-order.

According to Kosmo Foto, Mono features a traditional black-and-white chemistry that can be developed using Tetanal, Rodinal, Perceptol, and similar formulations, but it can’t be developed by mini-labs with only C41 processing. Mono 120 is suitable for use in a variety of shooting conditions, including both sunny and overcast environments.

Kosmo Foto requires pre-order customers to purchase at least three, but no more than 10, rolls of Mono 120 when ordering. Each roll costs £4.50 / $5.80 and is available now through the Kosmo Foto store; the company expects its first batch to be ready for shipment in May.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/4763046210/kosmo-foto-launches-mono-120-black-and-white-film-for-pre-order

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This website uses AI to generate portraits of people who don’t actually exist

A new website called This Person Does Not Exist went viral this week, and it has one simple function: displaying a portrait of a random person each time the page is refreshed. The website is pointless at first glance, but there’s a secret behind its seemingly endless stream of images. According to a Facebook post detailing the website, the images are generated using a generative adversarial networks (GANs) algorithm.

In December, NVIDIA published research detailing the use of style-based GANs (StyleGAN) to generate very realistic portraits of people who don’t exist. The same technology is powering This Person Does Not Exist, which was created by Uber software engineer Phillip Wang to ‘raise some public awareness for this technology.’

In his Facebook post, Wang said:

Faces are most salient to our cognition, so I’ve decided to put that specific pretrained model up. Their research group have also included pretrained models for cats, cars, and bedrooms in their repository that you can immediately use.

Each time you refresh the site, the network will generate a new facial image from scratch from a 512 dimensional vector.

Generative adversarial networks were first introduced in 2014 as a way to generate images from datasets, but the resulting content was less than realistic. The technology has improved drastically in only a few years, with major breakthroughs in 2017 and again last year with NVIDIA’s introduction of StyleGAN.

This Person Does Not Exist underscores the technology’s growing ability to produce life-like images that, in many cases, are indistinguishable from portraits of real people.

As described by NVIDIA last year, StyleGAN can be used to generate more than just portraits. In the video above, the researchers demonstrate the technology being used to generate images of rooms and vehicles, and to modify ‘fine styles’ in images, such as the color of objects. Results were, in most cases, indistinguishable from images of real settings.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/9597199609/this-website-uses-ai-to-generate-portraits-of-people-who-don-t-actually-exist

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Slideshow: International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Fireworks’ by Jill Welham | IGPOTY

The winning photographs from the International Garden Photographer of the Year Competition 12 have been announced, with the top prize going to photographer Jill Welham of North Yorkshire, England for the above photograph titled ‘Fireworks’ that was submitted under the Abstract category.

Passionate about the cyanotype print process, ‘Fireworks’ showcases the details of three Allium heads created using a wet cyanotype process.

‘This image of three Allium heads was created using a technique known as wet cyanotype. Two chemicals, ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide, are mixed together to create a photosensitive solution which is painted onto the surface of watercolour paper and left to dry,’ says Welham in the image’s description. ‘This process needs to be conducted away from UV light, and once dry the paper must be kept in a light-proof bag until it is used.

In addition to Welham’s photograph, we’ve rounded up the remaining dozen winners from each of the remaining twelve categories. The winning photographs were narrowed down from more than 19,000 entries from over 50 countries.

The IGPOTY Competition 13 contest is already taking submissions. You can find out more information and submit your work on the IGPOTY website.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Bressingham Gardens in Autumn’ by Richard Bloom | IGPOTY

‘Bressingham Gardens in Autumn’ by Richard Bloom | IGPOTY

1st Place in Beautiful Gardens

Norfolk, England, UK

Glorious early morning sun bathed TheSummer Garden at Bressingham in rich, warming light. Ornamental grasses are featured with swathes of Aster and Rudbeckia.

Gear/Settings: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV, Canon 16-35mm lens, 1/4sec at f/16, ISO 100. Tripod, cable release, polarising filter, neutral density graduated filter.

Post-capture: basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Farewell’ by Andrea Pozzi | IGPOTY

‘Farewell’ by Andrea Pozzi | IGPOTY

1st Place in Breathing Spaces

Torres del Paine National Park,Patagonia,Chile

The sun had already risen and the dawn had been incredible. Wandering through the vegetation, however, I realised that the essence of the territory was only revealing itself in that moment. The extraordinary colours of the sunrise had dissolved, leaving behind a unique intimate feeling amongst one of the most beautiful mountain ranges on Earth.

Gear/Settings: Canon EOS 6D, Canon 24-70mm lens, 1.3sec at f/13, ISO 200. Tripod, neutral density graduated filter, polarising filter.

Post-capture: basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Lost in the Lush Beauty’ by Vincenzo Di Nuzzo | IGPOTY

‘Lost in the Lush Beauty’ by Vincenzo Di Nuzzo | IGPOTY

1st Place in Captured at Kew

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London, England, UK

Opening the door of the Palm House at Kew is like entering a hidden paradise. It never fails to amaze me how fascinated and stunned I become in the presence of such natural beauty. I took this photograph whilst my friend was having a similar reaction to the sheer scale and abundance of lush tropical plants.

Gear/Settings: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, Canon 24-105mm lens, 1/60sec at f/8, ISO 400. Post-capture: basic image management

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Cork Oak’ by Scott Simpson | IGPOTY

1st Place in European Garden Photography Award

Gazebo Cádiz, Andalucía, Spain

There cannot be too many gardens in Europe that combinecork oaks (Quercus suber) with manicured gardens. I was commissioned to photograph such a place at a luxury real estate property in Andalucía. The garden had the added bonus of a raised gazebo, which was nestled amongst the mature cork oaks.

Gear/Settings: Canon EOS 7D, Canon 70-200mm lens, 1/30sec at f/13, ISO 100. Tripod.

Post-capture: basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Greenbelt’ by Halu Chow | IGPOTY

‘Greenbelt’ by Halu Chow | IGPOTY

1st Place in Greening the City

Kowloon, Hong Kong, China

I used infrared to precisely define the exact locations of plant life around the city, highlighting the scale and proximity of their presence. It is easy to forget the intimacy and importance of this relationship.

Gear/Settings: Canon IXUS860 IS, Canon 28-105mmlens, 1/100sec at f/2.8, ISO 100.Infrared converted camera.

Post-capture: basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Tropical Wonderland’ by Jocelyn Horsfall | IGPOTY

‘Tropical Wonderland’ by Jocelyn Horsfall | IGPOTY

1st Place: Portfolios, Abstract Views

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London, England, UK

The magical, dreamlike effect of infrared was the perfect way to express the mystery and exotic intrigue of the Palm House at Kew Gardens. I captured a selection of different plants and foliage to feature across the portfolio in order to show the subtle variety of textures and forms within this tropical paradise. Together the images vividly demonstrate the sense of lushness and tranquillity that the space provides.

Gear/Settings: Fujifilm X-E1, Fujifilm 14mm lens + Fujifilm 18-55mm lens + Fujifilm 18-135mm lens, 1/750sec to 1/125sec at f/7.1 to f/13, ISO 500 to ISO 800. Infrared converted camera.

Post-capture: colour tones matched across portfolio, Topaz filter, basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Lotus Tango’ by Kathleen Furey | IGPOTY

‘Lotus Tango’ by Kathleen Furey | IGPOTY

1st Place in The Beauty of Plants

Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens, Washington D.C., USA

There are many stages of lotus growth on display at theAquatic Gardens, but to come across two twisted dancing stems of Nelumbo nuciferawas unexpected and quite magical.

Gear/Settings: Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, Olympus 14-150mm lens, 1/320sec at f/5.3, ISO 200.

Post-capture: basic image management

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Colourful Fields’ by Suwandi Chandra | IGPOTY

‘Colourful Fields’ by Suwandi Chandra | IGPOTY

1st Place in The Bountiful Earth

Sembalun Lawang, Lombok, Indonesia

I hiked to the top of Pergasingan Hill early in the morning to catch the sunrise. The view was amazing as it overlooked the rolling hills opposite and Sembalun village below. Since most of the people here are farmers, they transform the valley floor into a patchwork of agriculture, growing rice, vegetables and even strawberries.

Gear/Settings: Pentax K-3, Pentax 16-50mm lens, 1/2sec at f/8, ISO 100. Tripod, neutral density graduated filter.

Post-capture: basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘View Over Trauttmansdorff’ by Harry Tremp | IGPOTY

‘View Over Trauttmansdorff’ by Harry Tremp | IGPOTY

1st Place in The Spirit of Trauttmansdorff, a special award that celebrates the unique character and beauty of The Gardens of Trauttmansdorff Castlein Merano, South Tyrol, Italy.

The golden hour was just approaching when I captured this view of Trauttmansdorff in October, the green of the deciduous trees just starting to begin their autumn transformation.

Gear/Settings: Sony α7R Mark III, Sony 24-105mm lens, 1/50sec at f/13, ISO 400.

Post-capture: basic image management

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Misty Bayou’ by Roberto Marchegiani | IGPOTY

‘Misty Bayou’ by Roberto Marchegiani | IGPOTY

1st Place in Trees, Woods & Forests

Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana, USA

The Louisiana wetlands are a giant tangle of canals, swamps and forests of palm and cypress trees that encompass the great Mississippi estuary. Populated by numerous snakes, alligators, birds and venomous spiders, the often-hostile environment is capable of stunning beauty. Every day at dawn and dusk we motored out on a small swamp boat –the only way to get around the bayou –looking for the best light and conditions. A fog finally descended around a singular majestic cypress (Taxodium), framed by the other trees and adorned with Spanish moss.

Gear/Settings: Nikon D850, Nikon 70-200mm lens,1/50sec at f/7.1, ISO 64.

Post-capture: basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Mount Rainier in the Mist’ by Robert Gibbons | IGPOTY

‘Mount Rainier in the Mist’ by Robert Gibbons | IGPOTY

1st Place in Wildflower Landscapes

Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, USA

I came across a spectacular array of summer alpine flowers on Mazama Ridge, including Castilleja, Lupinusand Anemone occidentalis, all adding character and texture to the scene as if by design.

Gear/Settings: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Canon 24mm tilt-shift lens, 1/13sec at f/20, ISO 200. Tripod.

Post-capture: basic image management

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Starlings’ by Jonathan Need | IGPOTY

‘Starlings’ by Jonathan Need | IGPOTY

1st Place in Wildlife in the Garden

Snowdonia National Park, Wales, UK

A heavy snowfall brought a lot of hungry birds to my garden feeder. This old nearby tap provided a convenient resting place for this trio of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) while they waited for their turn to feed.

Gear/Settings: Nikon D3S, Sigma 500mm lens, 1/500sec at f/5, ISO 800. Tripod.

Post-capture: basic image management.

International Garden Photographer of the Year Winners

‘Ladies of the Meadow’ by Jake Kneale | IGPOTY

‘Ladies of the Meadow’ by Jake Kneale | IGPOTY

1st Place in Young Garden Photographer of the Year

Wiltshire, England, UK

The rising sun backlit this group of lady’s smock (Cardamine pratensis) in a Wiltshire meadow.I used the aperture to turn the water droplets into beautiful bokeh and created a smooth, clean and glistening background.

Gear/Settings: Canon EOS 7D, Canon 70-200mm lens, 1/160sec at f/7.1, ISO 100.

Post-capture: basic image management.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/photography/7777489546/slideshow-international-garden-photographer-of-the-year-winners

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Nikon announces development of new firmware for Z6 and Z7 promising faster AF

Nikon has announced more details of firmware in development for the Z6, Z7, D5, D850 and D500.

As previously reported, firmware is being planned that will add Eye-detection AF, CFexpress support and Raw video over HDMI to the Z6 and Z7, with AF and AE improvements also coming in May.

While the date for the addition of Raw video and CFexpress support is still unconfirmed, Nikon has added more detail to earlier reports, including the fact that in durability testing, CFexpress media has been (successfully, we assume) “inserted and removed from a camera 12,000 times”. After the update, users of the Z6/7, D850, D5 and D500 will be able to use XQD or CFexpress cards in their cameras interchangeably.

The May 2019 update will add Eye-detection AF to the Z6 and Z7, alongside other AF/AE improvements including ‘faster autofocusing in dark or dimly lit surroundings’ and the addition of continuous AE to high speed (extended) shooting. Full details below.

Press release:

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW FIRMWARE FOR NIKON’S FULL-FRAME MIRRORLESS CAMERAS, THE NIKON Z 7 AND NIKON Z 6

Continuing to Adapt to Changing User Needs with the Addition of New Functions and Improvements of Capabilities

MELVILLE, NY (February 13, 2019 at 11:01 P.M. EST) – Nikon Inc. is pleased to announce additional details regarding the development of new firmware for its full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Nikon Z 7 and Nikon Z 6. The firmware in development includes new functions for the Z 7 and Z 6, such as Eye-Detection AF, RAW video output, and support for CFexpress memory cards. In addition, the cameras’ AF/AE functions will be further improved.

The Z series will continue to flexibly respond to changing user needs and offer next-generation features that give users new creative opportunities.

Functions and capabilities to be added and improved with new firmware:

1. Support for Eye-Detection AF for still image shooting (scheduled for release in May 2019).
Eye-Detection AF is convenient for portrait photography. The Eye-Detection AF in development will work not only with the AF-S (Single AF) focus mode that is convenient when photographing still human subjects, but also with the AF-C (Continuous AF) focus mode, which is effective when photographing human subjects that frequently adjust or change their pose. What’s more, the function is capable of detecting multiple eyes, from which the user can select the eye upon which the camera should focus, allowing the photographer greater flexibility when photographing multiple people to suit their intent.

2. Increased AF/AE performance (scheduled for release in May 2019)
AE (auto exposure) tracking will be newly possible in continuous high-speed (extended) mode, in addition to the AF tracking that existed previously. In addition, low-light AF performance will be improved, enabling faster autofocusing in dark or dimly lit surroundings with both still-image shooting and movie recording.

3. Support for RAW video output
Output of 4K UHD and Full HD RAW data stream from the camera will be supported. The output RAW data stream can then be recorded in the compatible RAW format using an external recorder. This will allow users to utilize rich 12-bit colors to achieve flexible color grading.

Release timing for this feature will be announced at a later date.

4. Support for CFexpress memory cards
The new firmware will provide support for CFexpress, a new standard for memory cards. Having passed durability tests in which they were inserted and removed from a camera 12,000 times, these memory cards offer users a greater sense of security. They also offer high-speed performance that will provide users with a more efficient workflow. After upgrading, users will be able to use both CFexpress as well as XQD cards in their camera interchangeably. In addition to the Z 7 and Z 6, in the future, CFexpress memory card support will be added to the Nikon D5 (XQD-Type), Nikon D850, and Nikon D500 digital SLR cameras as well.

Release timing for this feature will be announced at a later date.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/2961478322/nikon-announces-development-of-new-firmware-for-z6-and-z7

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Canon developing six new RF lenses, including ultra-compact 70-200 F2.8

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Canon has announced the development of six RF lenses which are expected to be released at various points in 2019.

The most captivating has to be the RF 70-200 F2.8L IS USM. The lens is almost impossibly small, yet manages to be as fast as Canon’s EF model. The 70-200 will be stabilized, though we won’t find out how many stops of shake reduction it provides for some time, as Canon has not yet published specs for any of the upcoming lenses.

Canon will be offering two versions of its RF 85mm F1.2L USM: a ‘regular’ model and a ‘DS’ variant. DS stands for Defocus Smoothing, which Canon says ‘offers a combination of beautifully smooth defocused bokeh.’ While we don’t know exactly what that means yet, it seems likely that the DS model includes an Apodization element, of the kind we’ve seen before in ‘APD’ and ‘STF’ lenses from other manufacturers.

The dual model approach echoes Fujifilm’s decision to market two versions of its XF 56mm F1.2 – a standard model and an ‘APD’ variant optimized for bokeh.

Meanwhile, there are two fast zooms on the way: the RF 15-35mm F2.8L IS USM and the RF 24-70 F2.8L IS USM.

Lastly, there’s a versatile (but slower) travel zoom lens in the works too – the RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM.

Press Release:

CANON ENSURES THE SUCCESSFUL FUTURE OF ITS RF MOUNT WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF SIX NEW LENSES

New Lenses Under Development Cover a Range of Core Focal Lengths

MELVILLE, N.Y., February 13, 2019 – Continuing with the message of “optics at its core,” Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced that its parent company, Canon Inc, is developing six new RF-series lenses, further displaying the company’s commitment to the EOS R full-frame mirrorless camera system. Canon’s new RF mount allows for fast, light, and high-performing optics with a large opening diameter and short back focus distance. Each new lens in development will help fulfill the needs of amateur and advanced amateurs to professional photographers and videographers, covering critical focal lengths. In 2019, Canon’s already well-established optical lens heritage will celebrate a production milestone of 140 million EF and RF lenses and the celebration starts with the development announcement of these six lenses[i].

The six new RF lenses under development include:

  • RF 85mm F1.2 L USM
  • RF 85mm F1.2 L USM DS
  • RF 24-70mm F2.8 L IS USM
  • RF 15-35mm F2.8 L IS USM
  • RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM
  • RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM

“Optics are the critical piece of the visual puzzle that bend light and capture an image as the artist envisioned,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “That is why it is so important for us to strengthen our family of RF lenses for the EOS R camera system. With this collection of new lenses, customers will have more of the tools they need, for the images they desire to create.”

All six RF lenses under development are built around Canon’s new RF mount, which features a large 54mm diameter and shorter back focus distance than on current EOS DSLR cameras. In addition, the RF mount enhances communication and power transmission between the lens and camera body, which has helped Canon to achieve the world’s fastest autofocus speed for a full-frame mirrorless camera system[ii].

The details of the new Canon RF lenses under development are as follows:

The RF 85mm F1.2 L USM is a large aperture mid-telephoto prime lens. It offers excellent performance for advanced and professional portrait photographers and is a widely popular focal length and aperture speed combination for users.

The RF 85mm F1.2 L USM DS, with Defocus Smoothing lens technology, is a uniquely designed lens that offers a combination of beautifully smooth defocused bokeh. Featuring a super-fast F1.2 aperture, the lens will help produce breathtaking portraits that will surely stand out from the crowd.

The RF 24-70mm F2.8 L IS USM is a high-performance, standard zoom lens for professionals and photo enthusiasts alike – ideal for shooting portraits, landscapes, documentaries or weddings.

The RF 15-35mm F2.8 L IS USM, offering a wide angle and fast aperture in a single package, is ideal for a variety of shooting applications including architecture, interiors or landscapes.

The RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM is a must-have for any professional photographer, especially for those shooting weddings, sports or wildlife. This lens is a great all-around, high-speed, medium telephoto zoom lens and does well to round out any camera bag.

The RF 24-240mm F4-6.3 IS USM is the ideal lens for amateurs and advanced amateurs who love to travel, no matter the destination. The versatile, all-purpose lens offers a range of focal lengths for capturing extraordinary shots in a form factor that is both compact and lightweight.

Availability

All six of the new Canon RF lenses under development are expected to be available later in 2019*. To learn more about the lenses under development and to follow along for the official announcement, please visit usa.canon.com

[i] 140 million milestone figure is the accumulated production as at 19th December 2018. Figure includes RF lenses and Cinema lenses

[ii] As of 13 February 2019, among interchangeable lens digital mirrorless cameras incorporating a 35mm full frame equivalent image sensor with contrast detection AF and phase detection AF on the image plane. Calculated from the results of measured AF speed, based on CIPA guidelines (differs depending on shooting conditions and lens used). Measured using internal methods. Measurement conditions: EV12 (ambient temperature/ISO 100), Manual Mode, using the RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM (at a focal length of 24mm) with the following settings: shutter released using the shutter button, 1-point AF (Center AF), One-Shot AF)

*Specifications, availability and prices are subject to change without notice. Actual prices are set by individual dealers and may vary.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/6734172114/canon-developing-six-new-rf-lenses-including-ultra-compact-70-200-f2-8

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Nikon announces Z 24-70mm F2.8 S – a new standard zoom for mirrorless

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Nikon has taken the wraps off a new standard zoom lens for mirrorless – the Z 24-70mm F2.8 S.

The Z 24-70mm F2.8 S has been on Nikon’s Z-series roadmap since the mount was announced last August, and is being pitched by Nikon as a perfect fast standard lens for the Z6 and Z7, offering a faster maximum aperture and more robust build quality than the more compact Z 24-70mm F4 S.

Compared to the AF-S 24-70mm F2.8 for F-mount, the new lens is 25% smaller and 18% lighter, with a totally redesigned optical formula comprising 17 elements in 15 groups. Two of the elements are Extra Low Dispersion (ED) glass, and four are aspherical. As well as Nikon’s Nano Crystal coating, the 24-70mm introduces a new ‘Arneo’ coat, which is promised to further reduce flare and ghosting. Fluorine coating on the front and rear elements is designed to help make it easier to clean oil and moisture from the outer surfaces of the lens.

Initial sample images from photographer Ami Vitale

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An customizable ‘L-Fn’ button is joined by an OLED panel, which can display various information, including focus distance, aperture and focal length. Also new, a third customizable ‘control ring’ joins focus and zoom rings to provide direct control over various exposure parameters (if desired).

The new Z 24-70mm F2.8 S will ship later this spring, at an MSRP of $2299.

Press release:

NIKON UNVEILS THE NIKKOR Z 24-70MM F/2.8 S, A FAVORITE ZOOM LENS REBORN FOR THE Z SERIES

The NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Implements the Latest Nikon Optical Technologies to Reinvent One of Nikon’s Most Coveted Zoom Lenses for the Full-Frame Mirrorless Z System

MELVILLE, NY (February 13, 2019 at 11:01 P.M. EST) – Today, Nikon Inc. announced the NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S: a much-anticipated, fast-aperture zoom lens that’s ideal for professional and advanced photographers who capture portraits, landscapes, weddings and events, as well as content creators who shoot video using Nikon’s revolutionary new Z Mount System. Designed to take full advantage of the wider, brighter and faster Z Mount, this new S-Line lens delivers stunning sharpness all the way to the corners of the frame, even when used at its maximum aperture.

The NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S is the first NIKKOR lens to use the all new Nikon-designed ARNEO coat, which is used in conjunction with Nikon’s Nano Crystal Coat to significantly minimize flare and ghosting. The lens also includes Nikon’s new Multi-Focus System to help ensure fast and accurate autofocus even when shooting close-up subjects. Additionally, the 24-70mm f/2.8 S is the first NIKKOR Z lens to feature a dedicated manual focus ring independent of the customizable control ring, a Function (L-Fn) button, and an Organic EL Lens Information Panel for quick reference of key settings such as focus distance, depth-of-field, aperture and focal length.

“The NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S is the lens that Z Series users have been waiting for, a lens that many photographers and videographers would never leave home without,” said Jay Vannatter, Executive Vice President, Nikon Inc. “Lightweight and tack sharp, the 24-70mm f/2.8 S is a great example of the outstanding performance and portability that is possible with our next-generation Z Mount System.”

NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S – Performance, Precision and Optical Superiority
The NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S builds on a century of Nikon optical heritage by harnessing the technical advantages of the Z Mount. This type of lens is known as a photographer favorite due to its versatility, useful zoom range, fast aperture and sharpness. Nikon was able to redesign this all-around zoom lens to achieve a new standard of performance, while making it both smaller and lighter—approximately 24.7% lighter and 18.4% shorter than the popular AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR lens.

The NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S takes advantage of the latest optical technologies to ensure exceptional control of aberration, ghosting and flare. Featuring an optical construction of 17 elements in 15 groups—including two ED glass elements and four aspherical elements—the lens delivers sharp, virtually vignette-free performance from edge-to-edge across its entire zoom range, even at maximum aperture.

Additionally, the NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S is the first NIKKOR lens to feature Nikon’s all-new ARNEO coating: a multi-layer coating that is used in conjunction with Nano Crystal Coating for superior anti-reflective performance. While Nano Crystal Coat suppresses ghosting and flare coming from backlight at diagonal angles, the ARNEO coat compensates for light entering the lens from vertical angles. This expanded field enables the lens to capture exceptional contrast and sharpness even when the light source is visible inside the frame.

To help ensure fast, accurate and silent autofocus, the NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S combines a powerful stepping motor (STM) with Nikon’s new Multi-Focus System. This system uses two actuators to move two focus groups at once, enabling the lens to achieve critical focus rapidly from nearly any distance, including close-up shooting.

The 24-70mm f/2.8 S is the most customizable NIKKOR Z lens yet. The lens features an Organic EL Lens Information Panel that allows for quick confirmation of aperture and focal length or focus distance and depth-of-field without looking at the viewfinder. For enhanced versatility, the addition of a L-Fn button allows you to set over 20 custom functions when shooting stills. The lens is also the first to feature an independent focus ring in addition to the customizable control ring found on all S-Line lenses, giving professional photographers and videographers more comfortable and convenient control over their shooting experience.

Finally, the NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S was designed to excel at video in addition to stills capture, taking full advantage of the industry-leading video features found in the Nikon Z 6 and Z 7. Its design minimizes focus breathing, preventing the angle of view from changing when the focus is adjusted; the stepping motor and Multi-Focus System ensure fast, accurate and quiet focusing; full compatibility with the built-in 5-axis VR of the Nikon Z System ensures users can capture super-smooth video hand-held; and the customizable control ring, independent focus ring and Organic EL panel give filmmakers even more control over this exceptional lens on-set.

The NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S is destined to be an instant classic—a must-own lens for Nikon Z Series creators of all types.

Key Features:

  • An indispensable standard zoom lens for professionals, advanced photographers and video creators—ideal for environmental portraits, landscapes, weddings, events, studio and street photography.
  • Constant f/2.8 aperture throughout the zoom range delivers the subject separation, speed and gorgeous bokeh professionals demand.
  • Exceptional optical performance achieves edge-to-edge sharpness and minimal aberration in an incredibly lightweight and portable package, thanks to the revolutionary new Z mount.
  • All-new ARNEO coating works in conjunction with Nikon’s Nano Crystal Coat to minimize ghosting and flare when the light source is within the frame.
  • Fast, accurate and quiet autofocus throughout the zoom range, thanks to Nikon-designed Multi-Focus System and Stepping Motor.
  • Built-in Function (L-Fn) button, Organic EL Lens Information Panel and independent focus ring give creators more control over their shooting experience.
  • Fully compatible with in-camera 5-axis VR found in the Nikon Z 6 and Z 7, providing up to 5 stops1 of image stabilization without adding to the size or weight of the lens.
  • Optimized for video, with reduced focus breathing, a quiet stepping motor, customizable control ring, and the ability to take advantage of the in-camera 5-axis VR + eVR of the Nikon Z 6 and Z 7.
  • Designed with consideration to dust and drip resistance, and featuring a fluorine coat that effectively repels dust, water droplets, grease and dirt.

Price and Availability:

The NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S will be available in spring 2019 at a suggested retail price (SRP) of $2,299.952.

For more information about this lens, as well as the latest Nikon products including the full Nikon Z Mount System, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

1. Based on CIPA Standard. This value is achieved when FX-format compatible lenses are attached to a FX-format digital SLR camera and zoom lenses are set at the maximum telephoto position.
2. SRP (Suggested Retail Price) listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time.

Nikon Nikkor Z 24-70mm F2.8 S specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Zoom lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 24–70 mm
Image stabilization No
Lens mount Nikon Z
Aperture
Maximum aperture F2.8
Minimum aperture F22
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 9
Optics
Elements 17
Groups 15
Special elements / coatings Four ED and two aspherical elements + Arneo and Nano Crystal coatings
Focus
Minimum focus 0.38 m (14.96)
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Stepper motor
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Physical
Weight 805 g (1.77 lb)
Diameter 89 mm (3.5)
Length 126 mm (4.96)
Sealing Yes
Zoom method Rotary (extending)
Power zoom No
Filter thread 82 mm
Hood supplied Yes

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/8863530532/nikon-announces-z-24-70mm-f2-8s-a-new-standard-zoom-for-mirrorless

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Canon EOS RP sample gallery

These images were shot at a pre-launch event organized by Canon in New Orleans. The cameras were full production units running firmware v1.0. There are also some images converted using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software, which was provided to us.

Canon EOS RP sample gallery

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Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter / magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing (in conjunction with this review), we do so in good faith, please don’t abuse it.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/samples/8896052852/canon-eos-rp-sample-gallery

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The Canon EOS RP is smaller than an EOS Rebel T7i and will cost $1300

The Canon EOS RP becomes that company’s second full-frame mirrorless camera, aimed at photographers stepping up from APS-C. Like the EOS R, it uses Canon’s new RF mount and is compatible with Canon’s large selection of EF and EF-S lenses via three optional adapters.

It uses a 26MP CMOS sensor and DIGIC 8 processor, along with a Dual Pixel AF system. This gives 4779 selectable AF points spread across an 88% horizontal / 100% vertical area of the frame. Canon is emphasizing the RP’s compact size – its 12.7 x 9.7 x 6.1 cm (5.0 x 3.8 x 2.4″) dimensions make it even smaller than a EOS Rebel T7i / 800D.

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The EOS RP shoots 4K/24p and 1080/60p video and offers up to 5 fps burst shooting (4 fps with Servo AF in shooting speed priority mode). A 3″ touchscreen with 1.04M dots is fully articulated, and the camera also provides a built-in 2.36M-dot OLED viewfinder.

Like the EOS R it lacks in-body stabilization and will rely on on lens IS. Canon’s beginner-friendly Visual Guide mode is included, as are Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

The Canon EOS RP will go on sale in March for $1300 body-only, $1999 with the EF lens adapter and EF 24-105mm IS STM lens, or $2400 with the RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM.

FULL FRAME FOR THE MASSES! CANON INTRODUCES ITS SECOND FULL-FRAME MIRRORLESS CAMERA – THE EOS RP

New Super-Compact and Ultra-Lightweight EOS RP is Ideal for Users Looking to Graduate to Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera at an Affordable Price

MELVILLE, N.Y., February 13, 2019 – Responding to the demand from amateur and advanced amateur photographers for an entry-level, full-frame mirrorless camera, Canon U.S.A. Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced the second camera in the EOS R lineup, the EOS RP. The EOS RP is designed for photographers looking to step up from Canon’s APS-C cameras: the EOS Rebel, EOS M and the EOS 80D, into the world of full-frame mirrorless photography. Weighing in at just 17.29 ounces, the EOS RP camera is lighter than a 500ml bottle of water and smaller than Canon’s popular APS-C DSLR camera, the Canon EOS Rebel T7i, coming in at approximately 5.0in (w) x 3.77in (h) x 2.36in (d). With optics at its core, the EOS RP takes full advantage of the complete line up of RF lenses and is compatible with the existing collection of Canon’s EF and EF-S lenses with the use of one of three optional RF EOS-R Mount Adapters .

“As Canon continues to evolve its full-frame mirrorless cameras, our goal is that one day the EOS R line becomes as widely popular as our celebrated lineup of EOS DSLR cameras,” said Kazuto Ogawa, president and chief operating officer, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “As a company, we believe that in order for us to accomplish that goal, Canon needs to develop full-frame mirrorless cameras for every skill level of photographers and that starts with amateurs and advanced amateurs. This makes the EOS RP the perfect addition to the existing lineup.”

The new Canon EOS RP full-frame mirrorless camera features a 26.2 megapixel CMOS sensor that is powered by the company’s DIGIC 8 image processor, providing users with high-image quality, outstanding operation and functionality. The new Canon EOS RP features Dual Pixel CMOS Auto Focus (AF) with 4,779 manually selectable AF points and a wide AF coverage area of 88 percent horizontal and 100 percent vertical. With f/1.2 lenses, the camera astonishingly boasts AF sensitivity in low light in as little as Exposure Value (EV) -5. When using the RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM lens with the EOS RP, the camera can focus in as little as 0.05 seconds with Dual Pixel CMOS AF . When using eye detection AF, the camera can automatically detect faces and focus on the eye of the subject. This feature is supported when the camera is set in either servo AF mode during continuous shooting and movie servo AF, as well as one-shot AF.

Like the EOS R full-frame mirrorless camera that was announced in September 2018, the EOS RP is built around the same 54mm mount diameter and short-back focus. This allows for the use of one of three optional mount adapters for full compatibility with all existing EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses. Through the use of the optional Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter or Control Ring Mount Adapter, these lenses, in fact, gain functionality.

For photographers looking to further expand their abilities and capture a wide variety of both still and video images, the EOS RP features Visual Guide mode. First introduced with the EOS Rebel T7i and EOS 77D, this mode allows users to see on screen how switching modes on the mode dial or tweaking settings can alter the image they are about to capture. This mode helps to guide photographers to capture more compelling images, such as ones with a shallow depth-of-field or being able to give moving subjects a frozen or flowing look. For those looking to expand their imaginative options, the camera also features Creative Assist mode that allows photographers to use new and unique visual effects and adjustments when shooting, such as brightness, contrast, saturation, color tone, monochrome and background blur. In addition, the design, ergonomics, layout and ease-of-use of the camera are very similar to that of other Canon cameras consumers might already be familiar with.

Additional noteworthy features of the EOS RP camera include:

  • Built-in 0.39 inch, 2.36 million dot Electronic Viewfinder with Touch-and-Drag AF
  • Vari-Angle LCD touchscreen
  • 4K UHD 24P/Full HD 60p video recording with 4K time-lapse shooting and the ability to extract still images from 4K video recordings
  • ISO range of 100-25,600 that is expandable up to ISO of 102,400
  • Built-in Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth® technology
  • Mobile RAW workflow supported paired with Digital Photo Professional Express App

Availability and Pricing
The Canon EOS RP full-frame mirrorless camera is scheduled to be available in March 2019 for an estimated retail price of $1299.00 for the body only. It will also be sold as a body-and-lens kit with the RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM lens for $2399.00*

To learn more about the EOS R system, including in-depth educational tutorials, please visit usa.canon.com

Canon EOS RP specifications

Price
MSRP $1299 (body), $1999 (w/EF adapter and EF 24-105mm STM IS lens), $2299 (w/RF 24-105mm F4L IS lens)
Body type
Body type SLR-style mirrorless
Body material Composite
Sensor
Max resolution 6240 x 4160
Image ratio w:h 1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 26 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 27 megapixels
Sensor size Full frame (35.9 x 24 mm)
Sensor type CMOS
Processor Digic 8
Color space sRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter array Primary color filter
Image
ISO Auto, 100-40000 (expands to 50-102400)
Boosted ISO (minimum) 50
Boosted ISO (maximum) 102400
White balance presets 6
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization No
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, normal
File format
  • JPEG
  • Raw (14-bit Canon CR3)
  • C-Raw (Canon original)
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Manual focus Yes
Number of focus points 4779
Lens mount Canon RF
Focal length multiplier 1×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Fully articulated
Screen size 3
Screen dots 1,040,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic
Viewfinder coverage 100%
Viewfinder magnification 0.7×
Viewfinder resolution 2,360,000
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
Built-in flash No
External flash Yes (via hot shoe)
Flash X sync speed 1/180 sec
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous (H/L)
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive 5.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2 or 10 secs, custom)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Partial
Exposure compensation ±3 (at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV steps)
WB Bracketing No
Videography features
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Modes
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 24p / 120 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p / 60 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 50p / 60 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p / 30 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 25p / 30 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC card (UHS-II supported)
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
USB charging Yes
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port Yes
Headphone port Yes
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth
Remote control Yes (via cable or smartphone)
Physical
Environmentally sealed No
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description LP-E17 lithium-ion battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 250
Weight (inc. batteries) 485 g (1.07 lb / 17.11 oz)
Dimensions 133 x 85 x 70 mm (5.24 x 3.35 x 2.76)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes
GPS None

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/5589043753/the-canon-eos-rp-is-smaller-than-an-eos-rebel-t7i-and-will-cost-1300

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Hands-on with the Canon EOS RP

Introduction

The Canon EOS RP is the entry-level body in Canon’s full frame range of mirrorless cameras. Its launch price of $1299 is the lowest of any digital full frame camera, a whole $400 below the initial cost of the first Sony a7.

It’s overtly aimed at upgraders from smaller-sensor cameras and first-time buyers of ILCs. To this end, the camera has the approachable user interface from Canon’s recent Rebel and EOS M models, but also offers two well-placed control dials for quick operation as you grow into the camera.

Body

The EOS RP is essentially a smaller, more conventional-looking variant of the EOS R. It has a polycarbonate shell on a magnesium alloy chassis, rather than the more durable-feeling magnesium alloy outer body of its bigger brother. It still fits well in the hand but there’s an optional add-on riser that bolts onto the base of the camera if you find your little finger extending beyond the bottom of the grip. This riser also helps the camera sit more stably on flat surfaces if you’ve got one of the system’s larger lenses mounted.

The two dials are well positioned if you have your hand in the shooting position, with the rear dial sitting under the top of your thumb and the front dial placed just above and behind the shutter button. The rear shoulder dial might be unfamiliar for anyone coming from high-end Canons but it’ll be familiar to anyone arriving from other systems, and will be a welcome addition for most Rebel users, who’re used to a single dial.

In addition, all of Canon’s RF lenses have a customizable control dial around them, meaning you can easily access up to three exposure parameters, if you wish.

Ports/Battery

The EOS RP has both headphone and mic sockets, along with a mini HDMI connector. It also has a USB-C socket which can be used for both data transfer and charging. Disappointingly, it’s only a USB type 2.0 interface, so don’t expect blazing data transfer rates.

The battery is the same LP-E17 unit used on Canon’s smaller mirrorless and Rebel models. It holds a relatively modest 6.3Wh of energy which yields a similarly modest 250 shots per charge (210 through the viewfinder). This isn’t good, but also isn’t quite as bad as it might sound: most users are likely to get more shots than this and maybe even a multiple of this number, depending on how they use the camera.

For a camera aimed primarily at casual shooters, it should last a decent amount of time, but if they do find themselves getting more into photography and shooting more intensively or use the Wi-Fi a lot, it’ll definitely be worth having a USB lead or spare battery to-hand lest it becomes frustrating.

Sensor

The EOS RP is based around a 26MP full frame sensor that uses Canon’s Dual Pixel design. This uses split pixels to give the camera’s focusing system an understanding of depth. We’ll discuss the autofocus performance later, but it helps ensure the RP can focus well with both its own, native lenses and adapted EF lenses.

We’re told the chip in the EOS RP is similar to the one in the EOS 6D II, which means its performance is likely to be a little off the pace. We’d expect it to be excellent at high ISOs but to have comparatively limited dynamic range at low ISO settings. So don’t expect to be able to shoot wide dynamic range scenes where you’d need to pull shadow information into the image: the tones not already included in the JPEG images will be noisier and less usable than contemporary rivals.

That said, this camera seems primarily targeted at users who’ll be mainly shooting JPEGs or those not trying to squeeze every last drop out of their Raws.

Viewfinder/screen

The EOS RP has a 2.36M dot OLED viewfinder. As you’d expect, this isn’t as detailed as the 3.69M dot finders used in the EOS R and more expensive models but it’s very useable. So don’t expect a near-optical-viewfinder experience, but it’s detailed and fast enough to refresh that it’s more than good enough for framing and assessing exposure (which an optical finder won’t help you with).

The rear monitor is a fully-articulated touchscreen. This lets you pull the screen all the way out alongside the camera, which can be a nice for shooting on a tripod, for waist-level shooting or for video capture. It also has the convenience that you can flip and fold the screen to face inwards, to protect it if you’re slinging it in a bag or glove-compartment.

The touchscreen operates as a touchpad for positioning the AF point, which is by far the most convenient way of doing so on the RP. You can choose whether the response is relative (so a left-swipe moves the point left from its current position) or absolute (swiping to the mid-point of the screen places the AF point at the middle of the image). If you find your nose risks touching the screen or blocking your access to the screen, you can limit the active area to a half or quadrant of the panel. The four-way controller can also be set to move the AF area – it’s slow, but a good way to do so with precision.

User Interface

The EOS RP includes the ‘Feature Assist’ mode from Canon’s recent Rebel DSLRs and EOS M mirrorless cameras. This guides the user in changing the camera settings in order to achieve shallower/deeper depth-of-field or how to freeze/blur motion but does so in a way that encourages the use of the same controls that you would in ‘regular’ mode.

We were really impressed with this mode on Canon’s entry-level models because it provides an easier way of working but also a stepping stone to learning how to operate individual camera parameters if you wish to. All of the normal Canon menus and options are still present, so you don’t get the sense of the camera being dumbed-down for more experienced users.

The RP gains a comparable interface for results-orientated processing of its Raw files, if you decide you want to warm or cool the image, relative to the way the JPEG first came out, or if you want to convert to black and white, for instance. Again, the more technically-inclined users can still access all the underlying settings (for batch-processing multiple images, if they want).

Connectivity

As you’d expect, the EOS RP features Bluetooth-mediated Wi-Fi, meaning that it will near-instantly recognize a smartphone that’s been Bluetooth paired and fire-up a Wi-Fi connection between them when you hit a button in Canon’s ‘Camera Connect’ app (on Android, at least – iOS can be awkward about such things).

The Wi-Fi connection itself takes a little longer but the app does a good job of showing you that it’s making the connection, rather than just leaving you wondering whether anything’s happening.

It’s pretty clear that Canon expects RP users to be sharing a lot of their images, either on social media or over email, so the ability to send the camera’s attractive JPEGs straight to a phone is important.

There will also be an iOS version of Canon’s Digital Photo Professional Raw-processing software available for the latest iPads. This is designed specifically to convert and adjust the CR3 files produced by recent Canon models.

Autofocus

For the most part, the EOS RP’s autofocus is a match for that of the EOS R, which is to say that it’s pretty quick, especially with those RF lenses build around Nano USM focus motors. We found subject tracking to be fairly effective, though not to the degree that we’d use it all the time (picking a subject then recomposing). The touchscreen makes it easy to choose your AF point or subject to track, so it’s all pretty friendly.

The big news on the RP is that the pupil-detection aspect of the ‘Face + Tracking’ mode now works in both continuous (Servo) AF mode, as well as single shot. Admittedly, a slight labeling glitch and tiny on-screen icons can make it a little tricky to tell when you’ve turned it on. Once engaged it finds eyes fairly well and lets you press the left and right directions on the four-way controller to pick which eye the camera should focus on.

Focus stacking

The EOS RP gains a focus bracketing function, which is especially useful for close-up and macro photography. This lets you shoot between 1 and 999 images and specify a focus increment that will be applied between each shot. The camera can even conduct exposure smoothing if the light is at all variable between shots.

The images themselves have to be merged using Canon’s DPP software, where you’re given the choice of which regions you want to be kept in sharp focus (including the whole image, if you want).

Video

Video is one of the areas we don’t expect the EOS RP to shine. Unlike the EOS 6D Mark II, it can shoot 4K/24p video, though it reverts to contrast detection AF. Thie footage is taken from the central, APS-C/Super 35 region of the sensor, which means the footage will likely be noisier than if it were taken from the whole sensor. The crop will also make it more difficult to find a lens that can offer a wide-angle field of view.

Other than 4K, the camera can shoot 1080 at up to 60p, and can conduct Eye-AF while shooting video (there’s no 24p option, though). We’ve not been that struck by the 1080 quality from recent Canons but, if nothing else, the digital IS (which comes at the cost of a crop) is good enough to allow hand-held shooting. As mentioned, you get a mic input and headphone out. This, combined with Dual Pixel AF, ensures the EOS RP should be a solid-enough camera for basic video shooting and maybe a bit of vlogging (though it wouldn’t be our first choice).

Lenses

Perhaps the main limitation for the EOS RP is its introduction into such a new system. It pairs quite nicely with the RF 24-105mm F4L IS zoom, creating a large-ish combination but one that covers a really useful zoom range. The only problem is that the ‘L’ designation ends up denoting a lens that’s almost as expensive as the RP itself.

The RF 35mm F1.8 is a comparatively good match, with its small size and $500 price tag, but beyond that, the current RF lens lineup (and much of that just revealed) end up being rather large or pro-orientated for a $1300 camera body. Though, frankly, the compact size of the 70-200mm F2.8 makes it pretty tempting, whatever you choose to mount it on, almost irrespective of how much Canon chooses to charge for it.

It’s presumably this dearth of affordable lenses that has prompted Canon to bundle the EOS RP with the more affordable EF 24-105mm F3.5-5.6 IS STM. The affordability is somewhat undermined by the need to include an adapter in the bundle, but this may increase its appeal for those users planning to use other Canon DSLR lenses.

It’ll be interesting to see how Canon prices its forthcoming 24-240mm travel lens [Pictured in mock-up form]. Mounted on the EOS RP it’ll make a handy do-anything pairing, though unless it’s significantly less expensive, we’d be tempted to stick with the 24-105mm F4L, since it works really nicely.

Conclusion

The Canon RP is based around a sensor we weren’t that impressed by, and we’re expecting plenty of ‘no IS, no purchase’ comments below our coverage, but we think it gets quite a lot right.

It’s less ambitious than the EOS R but by combining twin command dials with the excellent Feature Assist interface and a really keen price tag, it ends up looking rather charming.

There are lots of specs that enthusiasts will turn their noses up at (“2.5fps shooting in ‘Tracking Priority,’ LOL”), but there’s also a lot the EOS RP gets right. Not least the images it produces.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/articles/1575146892/hands-on-with-the-canon-eos-rp

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Fujifilm announces firmware version 2.00 for its X-T100 and X-A5 camera systems

In addition to a barrage of product announcements, Fujifilm has also updated the firmware for its X-T100 and X-A5 camera systems.

Both cameras will receive firmware 2.00 sometime this month, which will include three new and improved features.

The first of the three major features in the updates is a new ‘Bright Mode,’ which Fujifilm says ‘provides a brighter and more vivid image when using the Advanced SR Auto mode.’ If the feature isn’t wanted, it can easily be turned on and off with a tap on the LCD touchscreen on either camera.

Fujifilm has also added its Portrait Enhancer Mode to the X-T100 and X-A5 in these updates, which makes it easy to select from three levels of skin tone enhancement using the touchscreen.

The last major addition is a new Night+ Setting. This new setting automatically adjusts ISO, brightness and vividness of the picture to better render the image in low or poor light situations.

Firmware version 2.00 for the X-T100 and X-A5 and instructions on how to install it can be found on Fujifilm’s website.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/3173046271/fujifilm-announces-firmware-version-2-00-for-its-x-t100-and-x-a5-camera-systems

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Fujifilm announces the FinePix XP140, its latest ruggedized point-and-shoot

Fujifilm has announced the impending release of the FinePix XP140, its latest rugged point-and-shoot that adds new automated features and improved durability against the elements.

The compact camera is waterproof to 25m / 82ft, shockproof up to 1.75m / 5.9ft, freeze-proof to -10°C / 14ºF and dustproof. Compared to its predecessor, the XP130, this is an improved waterproof depth of 5m / 17ft, with all of the other stats staying more or less the same. The XP140 also includes a more pronounced grip for better handling in rough environments.

At the heart of the XP140 is the 16.4 megapixel 1/2.3-inch backside illuminated (BSI) CMOS sensor with a maximum sensitivity of ISO 12800, a stop higher than the XP130. In front of the sensor is an optically stabilized Fujinon 5x optical zoom lens that starts at 28mm (35mm equivalent). With Fujifilm’s Digital Zoom technology, the camera reaches 10x zoom.

An example of a scene using Fujifilm’s Eye Detection mode.

New to the XP140 is Fujifilm’s evolved Scene Recognition Auto mode, which ‘can detect a main subject within a scene and automatically optimize the camera setting[s].’ Also included is an ‘Eye Detection’ feature that focuses on subjects’ eyes and other auto-intelligent modes including a timer mode that automatically triggers the shutter when the camera detects a smile.

Fujifilm has also included 17 of its ‘Advanced Filters’ including its Rich & Fine and Monochrome (NIR) presets.

On the connectivity front, Fujifilm has included Bluetooth for easy connection to smartphones via its Fujifilm Camera Remote app and Instax printers.

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The FinePix XP140 will be available at authorized Fujifilm retailers in yellow, blue in the United States and yellow, blue, lime, white and dark silver in Canada. It’s expected to be released in March 2018 for $229.95 USD / $239.99 CAD.

FUJIFILM EVOLVES ITS RUGGED XP SERIES FURTHER WITH THE LAUNCH OF THE NEW FINEPIX XP140

Developed for adventure, the latest camera in the XP series boasts a variety of updated automatic shooting functions in a compact and lightweight design, with added protections to combat the elements.

Valhalla, New York, February 14, 2019 – FUJIFILM North America Corporation today announced the launch of the FUJIFILM FinePix XP140 (XP140), the latest rugged camera in the XP series. The newest addition includes upgrades to the construction of former models in the XP series, making it waterproof to 82 feet, shockproof from up to 5.9ft1, freeze-proof to 14°F and dustproof– the ideal accessory to capture any adventure.

The compact camera weighing in at only 7.3oz2 (207g) also features powerful image quality made possible with its FUJINON lens, which incorporates Fujifilm’s renowned color reproduction technology and 16.4 megapixel back-illuminated CMOS sensor. The XP140 also comes with variety of automatic functions such as main subject recognition and an easy-to-use interface, making it an ideal choice for a wide variety of shooting situations with ease-of-use for photographers of all levels

Four Rugged Features: Waterproof, Shockproof, Freeze-proof and Dustproof The XP140 complies with waterproof and dustproof protection standards of products, stipulated by IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission). The XP140 is waterproof to 82 feet, which is 25% improvement from its predecessor XP model. With its stylish design enhanced, the XP140 is easy-to-use during outdoor activities with features including a grip and a double-locking mechanism for the battery compartment. With the XP140, users are able to enjoy capturing their adventures without worrying about water, sand or dropping the camera — making it the perfect camera for users looking for their first, serious camera experience as well.

High-Performance Sensor and Lens for Premium Image Quality Equipped with a CMOS sensor and FUJINON’s 5x optical zoom lens with the zoom range starting from 28mm (35 format equivalent) on the wide-angle side, the XP140’s optical zoom range will reach up to 10x with Fujifilm’s Intelligent Digital Zoom technology. The camera also has an optical image stabilization mechanism and output sensitivity as high as ISO12800 (one stop higher than the XP130 model) to produce sharp images free of noise even in low light conditions. Fujifilm’s years of experience are reflected within its color reproduction technology, which ensures beautiful colors in any condition.

Versatile Automatic Shooting Functions to Support Your Photography Experience With evolved ‘Scene Recognition Auto’ mode, the XP140 can detect a main subject within a scene and automatically optimize the camera setting. The ‘Eye Detection’ feature helps to capture portraits easily by automatically focusing on the eyes of the subject. A variety of other auto-intelligent features such as the self-timer mode – which automatically releases the shutter when detecting a smiling face– helps capture instant moments. The camera also features 17 variations of ‘Advanced Filters’ including the new “Rich & Fine” and “Monochrome (NIR)”. These selections are fully assisted with an implemented unique live-view interface.

Bluetooth® Pairing and Wireless Connectivity for Automatic Photo Transfer and INSTAX® Printing Bluetooth® compatibility allows automatic and instant image transfer to smartphones and tablet devices by easy paring registration. The technology also syncs the time and location information from your device and attaches it to images, as well as enables remote shooting function via application. To utilize this feature, users can download the free “FUJIFILM Camera Remote” app to their smartphone or tablet device and easily transfer photos and videos in the camera to the device and download directly. For INSTAX SHARE SP printer users, images can be transferred from the camera directly to the INSTAX SHARE SP printer for quick printout.

Availability and Pricing The FinePix XP140 will available in yellow or sky-blue in the U.S and available in sky blue, lime, yellow, white and dark silver in Canada. It is anticipated to be released in March 2019 for USD $229.95 and CAD $239.99.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/6483340629/fujifilm-announces-the-finepix-xp140-its-latest-ruggedized-point-and-shoot

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Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 sample gallery

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Fujifilm’s XF 16mm F2.8 compact prime is one of the widest lens of its type in the company’s lineup (tied with the existing 16mm F1.4 WR). It comes with a 24mm-equivalent field of view, an aperture ring, weather sealing and impressively fast autofocus. But most importantly, how are the optics? Take a look through our sample gallery (shot with a pre-production sample) to get a glimpse of just how well this lens performs against the backdrop of a snowy Seattle winter.

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/samples/6397329933/fujifilm-xf-16mm-f2-8-sample-gallery

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Weather-resistant Fujifilm 16mm F2.8 lens to ship in March for $399

The Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR is a compact and lightweight wide-angle prime for the company’s APS-C mirrorless bodies. The lens is equivalent to 24mm when mounted on an X-series camera, such as the new X-T30. It contains a total of 10 elements (two of which are aspherical) and nine rounded aperture blades.

The lens, which weighs just 155g/5.5oz, uses a stepping motor for ‘fast and quiet autofocus’ and can focus as close as 17cm/6.7in. The lens is weather-sealed at nine points around the barrel and can function at temperatures as low as -10°C/+14°F.

The XF 16mm F2.8 R WR will be available in black in March, with the silver version to follow in May. The suggested retail price for both is $399.

Take a look at our initial impressions of the new Fujifilm 16mm F2.8

Press Release

FUJINON XF 16mmF2.8 R WR Lens

Designed to deliver the high performance resolution from Fujifilm’s X-TRANS CMOS sensors through its precise optical design, the XF16mmF2.8 R WR adopts an internal focusing system and stepping motor to provide extremely fast and near-quiet auto-focusing. Although light and compact, the design incorporates metal components on the exterior of the lens, while interior is sealed around the barrel in nine different locations to ensure durability and weather-resistance to the surrounding environment. The XF16mmF2.8 R WR joins the collection of affordable, compact, and lightweight lenses within the FUJINON XF Lens System, making it the perfect companion to the XF23mmF2 R WR, XF35mmF2 R WR, and XF50mmF2 R WR lenses.

  • High Resolution Performance: Edge-to-edge sharpness from the center to the corners of the frame is achieved by the precise arrangement of 10 lens elements in 8 groups. This lens also includes two aspherical elements, which assist in suppressing the image degrading effects of chromatic aberration and field curvature imperfection.
  • Compact, Lightweight and Stylish design: Weighing in at 5.47oz (155g) and measuring just 1.79in (45.4mm) in length, this lens offers up the renowned image quality and refined style associated with the FUJINON XF family of lenses. With its metal exterior, precise click stops, and smooth dampening, this lens offers incredible image quality in a durable, aesthetically pleasing appearance.
  • Fast and Quiet Autofocus: The inner focusing AF system uses a stepping motor to move focusing elements into place through precise electrical pulses in order to achieve fast and near-silent autofocus performance.
  • Weather and Dust Resistant Durability: The lens is designed to operate in temperatures as low as 14° Fahrenheit and is sealed at nine points around the barrel, making it both weather and dust resistant.

FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR Optional Accessories:

  • 49mm Front lens cap (FLCP-49)
  • 49mm Protect filter (PRF-49)

FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR Specifications:

  • Lens construction: 10 elements, 8 groups (includes 2 aspherical elements)
  • Focal length (35mm format equivalent: f=16mm (24mm)
  • Angle of view: 83.2°
  • aperture: F2.8
  • aperture: F22
  • Aperture control
  • Number of blades: 9 (rounded diaphragm opening)
  • Stop size: 1/3EV (19 stops)
  • Focus range: 17cm and beyond
  • magnification: 0.13x
  • External dimensions: Diameter x Length: Approx: Φ60.0mm x 45.4mm
  • Weight (excluding caps, hoods): Approx. 155g
  • Filter size: Φ49mm10

Availability and Pricing

The FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR lens is expected to be available in black in March 2019 or silver in May 2019, at a suggested retail price of USD $399.95 and CAD $499.99.

Fujifilm XF 16mm F2.8 R WR specifications

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size APS-C / DX
Focal length 16 mm
Image stabilization No
Lens mount Fujifilm X
Aperture
Maximum aperture F2.8
Minimum aperture F22
Aperture ring Yes
Number of diaphragm blades 9
Optics
Elements 10
Groups 8
Special elements / coatings 2 aspherical elements
Focus
Minimum focus 0.17 m (6.69)
Maximum magnification 0.13×
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Stepper motor
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Physical
Weight 155 g (0.34 lb)
Diameter 60 mm (2.36)
Length 45 mm (1.77)
Sealing Yes
Colour Black, silver
Filter thread 49 mm
Hood supplied Yes

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/8448645771/weather-resistant-fujifilm-16mm-f2-8-lens-to-ship-in-march-for-399

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Fujifilm X-T30 offers most of the X-T3’s feature set for $900

Fujifilm has unveiled the X-T30, its latest APS-C mirrorless camera. The X-T30 provides many of the features found in the higher-end X-T3, including its 26.1MP X-Trans sensor and X-Processor 4 Quad Core-CPU, along with some autofocus improvements that will come to the X-T3 later via a firmware update.

The X-T30 offers a hybrid AF system with 425 points across the entire frame, and boasts faster face detection compared to its X-T20 predecessor. Eye detection AF can be used in AF-C mode, and phase detection AF is now usable in lower light conditions.

On the video front, the X-T30 offers a surprisingly robust feature set including 4K/30p and 10-bit 4:2:2 output via HDMI and 8-bit 4:2:0 internal recording. That’s one of a few key differences between the X-T30 and X-T3 – upgrading to the X-T3 gets you 10-bit 4:2:0 internal and 4K/60p.

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The X-T30 is an altogether smaller and lighter camera than the X-T3 (383 g / 13.5 oz compared to 539 g / 19 oz) and offers a smaller, lower-resolution viewfinder – 0.62x and 2.36M-dot to the X-T3’s 0.75x and 3.69M-dot EVF. A 3″ 1.04M-dot touchscreen tilts on one axis, and a single card slot is offered.

A new, lower native ISO of 160 is offered, and burst shooting with continuous autofocus tops out at 20 fps (8 fps with mechanical shutter). Bluetooth connectivity has been added on top of the Wi-Fi offered by the X-T20, and battery life sees a slight improvement over its predecessor as well – 380 shots versus 350 shots per charge (CIPA).

Official Fujifilm X-T30 sample images by Bryan Minear

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The Fujifilm X-T30 will go on sale in March for $899 body-only, $999 with XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS Power Zoom or $1299 with 18-55mm F2.8-4. At launch the X-T30 will be offered in black or silver, with a handsome charcoal silver option to follow in June.

Press release:

FUJIFILM LAUNCHES THE NEW FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR LENS AND THE FUJIFILM X-T30, A NEW MIRRORLESS DIGITAL CAMERA IN A UNIQUELY LIGHTWEIGHT AND COMPACT DESIGN

– Updates to FUJIFILM X Series lineup including the new the X-T30, which packs greater image quality and UHD 4K video-recording capability into its thin, lightweight body (just 13.51oz) (383g);
– The FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR wide angle lens for X Series announced;
– Forthcoming firmware releases for FUJIFILM X-T3, FUJIFILM X-T100 and FUJIFILM X-A5;
– New version of FUJIFILM Camera Remote app available

Valhalla, New York, February 14, 2019 – FUJIFILM Corporation today unveiled several new announcements for the FUJIFILM X Series lineup, including the launch of the FUJIFILM X-T30 (X-T30), its new mirrorless digital camera that provides photographers of all levels with enhancements in image quality at greater speed and accuracy. Fujifilm also announced the FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR wide angle lens with a compact, lightweight and weather-resistant design for its XF family of interchangeable lenses.

X-T30
The new system features Fujifilm’s X-Trans CMOS 4 Sensor. This 4th generation, 26.1 megapixel imaging sensor, is one of the highest resolution sensors among APS-C sensor digital cameras. The small, lightweight camera also takes advantage of Fujifilm’s new X-Processor 4 Quad Core-CPU, which provides content creators of all levels with fast auto-focus (AF), accurate face detection and enough power to create beautiful, high-resolution stills. The sensitivity of ISO 160 — previously only available as extended ISO — is now available as a regular ISO option and will serve to facilitate capturing moments in bright daylight outdoors.

The X-T30 also includes advanced features such as the Focus Lever which enables users to quickly and easily shift to a focus point, an intuitive touch-screen panel, and an ergonomic body design to ensure hand-held stability in versatile shooting conditions. At a weight of just 13.51oz, the compact and lightweight body is comfortable to hold even when it is mounted with a large lens, such as a telephoto zoom.

Evolved for video-recording capability, the X-T30 offers the ability to record ultra high-definition (UHD) 4K or Full HD 1080p video and high quality audio – without additional equipment – to accommodate the needs of a wide range of content creators.

  • Professional Performance: The 26.1MP BSI APS-C X-Trans CMOS 4 image sensor and X-Processor 4 quad-core CPU combination allows for reliable and accurate AF and Face Detection performance when capturing high-resolution stills or recording 4k video of moving subjects.
  • Advanced Image Quality: The new X-Processor 4 Quad Core-CPU doubles the speed of face-detection for moving people compared to the X-T20. Additionally, eye-detection AF now works in AF-C mode, which results in accurate focus-tracking for moving portrait subjects. The low-light limit for phase detection AF has been expanded even more from the conventional +0.5EV to -3EV, to allow for operation in a wide range of lighting scenarios.
  • Superior Video and Image Effects: Offers the ability to record 4K video at 30 frames per second or capture of 120 frames per second at 1080p to create super slow motion effects. Filmmakers needing high color fidelity can record 10-bit, 4:2:2 color through the camera’s HDMI port. Leveraging Fujifilm’s advanced color reproduction technology, users are able to record video in ‘Film Simulation’ modes. The X-T30 also incorporates numerous shooting functions, such as “monochrome adjustments” available for ACROS and Monochrome, and “Color Chrome” effect that produces uniquely deep colors and gradation in subjects with highly saturated colors, which are notoriously difficult to photograph.
  • Easy-to-Use Design: Offers 3 inch touch LCD with 2-way tilting and optimal touch screen to capture images easily in challenging situations. Provides advanced SR Auto mode –easily activated with a lever — to automatically choose the optimum shooting settings out of 58 presets for any given scene.
  • Mobility: Built-in Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth V.4.2 offers digital communication with the free FUJIFILM Camera Remote app to wirelessly control the camera or share images to smart devices.

Carrying on with the tradition of the FUJIFILM X-T10 (released in June 2015), and the FUJIFILM X-T20 (released in February 2017), the new model retains the X Series’ signature dial-based, manual controls and proprietary color reproduction technology, along with a complete range of shooting functions designed to attract a broad range of users from professional photographers and independent filmmakers to first-time beginners.

FUJIFILM X-T30 Specifications:

  • 26.1M BSI APS-C X-Trans CMOS 4
  • X-Processor 4 quad-core CPU
  • 100% phase detect AF across the entire frame
  • Excellent face and eye detection AF with new Face Selection option
  • 2.36M-dot OLED EVF
  • 3 inch 1.04M-dot 2-way tilting Touch LCD with smooth and fast drag controls
  • 4K/30p, Full HD 120fps, H.264 compression option
  • External HDMI recording capable of 4:2:2 10 bit quality
  • 1x SD UHS-I card slot • Built-in Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth V.4.2
  • Headphone Jack via USB-C Adapter (3rd Party)
  • USB-C
  • NP-W126S battery

FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR Lens
Designed to deliver the high performance resolution from Fujifilm’s X-TRANS CMOS sensors through its precise optical design, the XF16mmF2.8 R WR adopts an internal focusing system and stepping motor to provide extremely fast and near-quiet auto-focusing. Although light and compact, the design incorporates metal components on the exterior of the lens, while interior is sealed around the barrel in nine different locations to ensure durability and weather-resistance to the surrounding environment. The XF16mmF2.8 R WR joins the collection of affordable, compact, and lightweight lenses within the FUJINON XF Lens System, making it the perfect companion to the XF23mmF2 R WR, XF35mmF2 R WR, and XF50mmF2 R WR lenses.

  • High Resolution Performance: Edge-to-edge sharpness from the center to the corners of the frame is achieved by the precise arrangement of 10 lens elements in 8 groups. This lens also includes two aspherical elements, which assist in suppressing the image degrading effects of chromatic aberration and field curvature imperfection.
  • Compact, Lightweight and Stylish design: Weighing in at 5.47oz (155g) and measuring just 1.79in (45.4mm) in length, this lens offers up the renowned image quality and refined style associated with the FUJINON XF family of lenses. With its metal exterior, precise click stops, and smooth dampening, this lens offers incredible image quality in a durable, aesthetically pleasing appearance.
  • Fast and Quiet Autofocus: The inner focusing AF system uses a stepping motor to move focusing elements into place through precise electrical pulses in order to achieve fast and near-silent autofocus performance.
  • Weather and Dust Resistant Durability: The lens is designed to operate in temperatures as low as 14° Fahrenheit and is sealed at nine points around the barrel, making it both weather and dust resistant.

FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR Optional Accessories:

  • 49mm Front lens cap (FLCP-49)
  • 49mm Protect filter (PRF-49)

FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR Specifications:

  • Lens construction: 10 elements, 8 groups (includes 2 aspherical elements)
  • Focal length (35mm format equivalent: f=16mm (24mm)
  • Angle of view: 83.2°
  • Max. aperture: F2.8
  • Min. aperture: F22
  • Aperture control
  • Number of blades: 9 (rounded diaphragm opening)
  • Stop size: 1/3EV (19 stops)
  • Focus range: 17cm and beyond
  • Max. magnification: 0.13x
  • External dimensions: Diameter x Length: Approx: Φ60.0mm x 45.4mm
  • Weight (excluding caps, hoods): Approx. 155g
  • Filter size: Φ49mm10

Availability and Pricing
The X-T30 digital camera body and kits are anticipated to be available in March 2019 in the popular black and premium silver for a suggested retail price of USD $899 and CAD $1,199.99. The X-T30 body with XC15-45mm lens kit will be available at a suggested retail price of USD $999 and CAD $1,299.99. The X-T30 body with XF18-55mm lens kit will be offered at a suggested retail price of USD $1,299 and CAD $1,699.99. All camera and kit variations of the new charcoal silver color will be available in June 2019.

The FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR lens is expected to be available in black in March 2019 or silver in May 2019, at a suggested retail price of USD $399.95 and CAD $499.99.

New Firmware Updates for FUJIFILM X-T3
New firmware version [FUJIFILM X-T3 Ver. 3.00] for the FUJIFILM X-T3 will be released in April 2019 to strengthen the accuracy of the X-T3’s face/eye detection feature, and to provide enhanced AF performance and speed, and operability of the X-T3 touch screen.

  • Enhanced Accuracy of Face/Eye Detection and AF Performance: The X-T3 firmware update provides improvements in the X-T3’s AF algorithm, with face detection of the X-T3 enhanced by approximately 30%. Additionally, the firmware serves to make the AF tracking even more stable not only in still photos but also in video recording.
  • New “Face Select” Function: The new X-T3 firmware update adds a new “Face Select” function to provide priority auto-focus, tracking, and exposure on a selected subject when multiple faces are detected within a frame. X-T3 users can make a selection via the touch screen or focus lever.
  • Fast AF Speed: The X-T3’s new firmware update provides the camera with a new AF algorithm, which improves the AF speed from previous versions, regardless if the subject is located a short distance or farther away.
  • Intuitive Operability: The firmware update provides additional settings for the X-T3’s touch screen that provide enhanced ease-of-use when focusing.

New Firmware Updates for FUJIFILM X-T100 and FUJIFILM X-A5
Available starting February 2019, the new firmware FUJIFILM X-T100 Ver. 2.00, FUJIFILM X-A5 Ver. 2.00 for the FUJIFILM X-T100 and for the FUJIFILM X-A5, respectively, will include advanced features for shooting a variety of scenes.

  • New “Bright Mode”: Provides a brighter and more vivid image when using the “Advanced SR Auto” mode. It can be easily turned on and off with a single tap via the LCD touch-screen.
  • “Portrait Enhancer” Mode: The popular “Portrait Enhancer” mode is now available with customizations to meet a range of different skin tones.
  • New “Night+ Setting”: The “Night+” mode automatically adjusts ISO, brightness and vividness of the picture for enhanced quality in poor light situations.

New Version of the FUJIFILM Camera Remote App
Fujifilm will also launch the newest version of the FUJIFILM Camera Remote (Ver. 4.0) app to connect smart devices to Fujifilm’s wireless-equipped digital cameras to enable seamless transfer of photos and remote-control shooting features. The newly designed interface of the new FUJIFILM Camera Remote app allows for a quicker pairing process and an “album” function to quickly arrange photos imported from the camera. The new version will be available in the App Store for iOS™ devices in March 2019 and available in the Google play store for Android™ devices in May 2019.

Fujifilm X-T30 specifications

Price
MSRP $899 (body only), $999 (w/15-45mm lens), $1299 (w/18-55mm lens)
Body type
Body type SLR-style mirrorless
Body material Metal
Sensor
Max resolution 6240 x 4160
Image ratio w:h 1:1, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 26 megapixels
Sensor size APS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)
Sensor type BSI-CMOS
Processor X-Processor 4
Color space sRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter array X-Trans
Image
ISO Auto, 160-12800 (expands to 80-51200)
Boosted ISO (minimum) 80
Boosted ISO (maximum) 51200
White balance presets 7
Custom white balance Yes (3 slots)
Image stabilization No
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, normal
File format
  • JPEG (Exif v.2.3)
  • Raw (Fujifilm 14-bit RAF)
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lamp Yes
Manual focus Yes
Number of focus points 425
Lens mount Fujifilm X
Focal length multiplier 1.5×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Tilting
Screen size 3
Screen dots 1,040,000
Touch screen Yes
Screen type TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic
Viewfinder coverage 100%
Viewfinder magnification 0.93× (0.62× 35mm equiv.)
Viewfinder resolution 2,360,000
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 900 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/4000 sec
Maximum shutter speed (electronic) 1/32000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Program
  • Aperture priority
  • Shutter priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • SR Auto
  • Portrait
  • Portrait Enhancer
  • Landscape
  • Sport
  • Night
  • Night (tripod)
  • Fireworks
  • Sunset
  • Snow
  • Beach
  • Underwater
  • Party
  • Flower
  • Text
Built-in flash Yes
Flash range 5.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flash Yes (via hot shoe)
Flash modes Auto, on, slow sync, manual, commander
Flash X sync speed 1/180 sec
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous H
  • Continuous L
  • Bracket
Continuous drive 30.0 fps
Self-timer Yes
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±5 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing ±5 (2, 3, 5, 7 frames at 1/3 EV, 1/2 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV, 2 EV steps)
WB Bracketing Yes
Videography features
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Modes
  • 4096 x 2160 @ 30p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 4096 x 2160 @ 25p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 4096 x 2160 @ 24p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 4096 x 2160 @ 23.98p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 30p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 25p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 24p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 23.98p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 120p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 50p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 25p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 24p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 23.98p / 200 Mbps, MOV, H.264, Linear PCM
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC card (UHS-I supported)
Connectivity
USB USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 GBit/sec)
USB charging Yes
HDMI Yes (micro-HDMI)
Microphone port Yes
Headphone port No
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes 802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.2
Remote control Yes (via wired remote or smartphone)
Physical
Environmentally sealed No
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description NP-W126S lithium-ion battery & Charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 380
Weight (inc. batteries) 383 g (0.84 lb / 13.51 oz)
Dimensions 118 x 83 x 47 mm (4.65 x 3.27 x 1.85)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording Yes
GPS None

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/news/4369722134/fujifilm-x-t30-offers-most-of-the-x-t3-s-feature-set-for-900-body-only

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Fujifilm X-T30 review in progress

Fujifilm’s new X-T30 brings much of the feature set of the high-end X-T3 at a more reasonable price. If that sounds familiar, it’s because the relationship between the X-T20 and X-T2 was the same.

With the X-T30 you receive the same 26MP sensor and processor as the X-T3, a more advanced AF system (which the X-T3 will soon gain via firmware update,) plenty of direct controls and a tilting touchscreen, all in a smaller body. The X-T30 also comes at a significantly lower price than the X-T3, with the body priced at $899, versus $1499 for the X-T3. We’ll discuss what features are cut in order to make the X-T30 the less expensive of the two options a bit later in this article.

Key specifications

  • 26.1MP APS-C X-Trans BSI-CMOS 4 sensor
  • X-Processor 4
  • Hybrid AF system has 425 phase-detect points spread across the entire frame
  • Burst shooting at 30 fps with no blackout (but 1.25X) crop using electronic shutter; 20 fps without crop
  • 2.36M-dot OLED viewfinder w/0.62x equiv. magnification and 100 fps refresh rate in boost mode
  • 3″ tilting touchscreen display
  • Dedicated drive, shutter speed and exposure compensation dials
  • Joystick for AF point selection
  • Eterna Film Simulation mode
  • DCI and UHD 4K/30p capture using full width of sensor
  • 4:2:0 8-bit internal recording or 4:2:2 10-bit HDMI output
  • USB-C socket with headphone support
  • Single SD card slot (UHS-I only)

That’s a lot of camera for under $900 body-only. If you’d like to add a lens, you can get the camera and the 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS Power Zoom lens for $999, or with the excellent 18-55 F2.8-4 lens for $1299. The traditional black and silver models will be available in March, with the ‘charcoal silver’ model shown in this review coming in June.


What’s new and how it compares

The X-T30 borrows the sensor and processor from the more expensive X-T3, and that’s great news. It has a more advanced AF system (for now) and impressive video specs for its price range.

Read more

Body and handling

For a $900 camera, the X-T30 is surprisingly well-built. It has a tilting touchscreen LCD, nice EVF and direct controls that make it a pleasure to use.

Operation and controls

In addition to four customizable buttons you can also ‘swipe’ the X-T30’s LCD in one of four directions to adjust settings. The camera offers two different customizable menus so you can set it up the way you’d like.

Read more

Original source: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilm-x-t30-review-in-progress

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